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Knight: Farewell to America's Captain

Written By Editor on 9/26/14 | 9/26/14


O' Captain, my Captain. 

After fifteen years of watching professional baseball - starting at age six - the last great hero of my youth is gone. Never to be seen again in Major League Baseball, or any other so-called professional level of athletics, for that matter. 

Yes, I'm talking about the legendary New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter. And I don't use the word legendary lightly, with respects to the steroid tainted embarrassment the past decade has been to baseball. 

Furthermore, I will openly admit to my deep seeded and passionate hatred for the Yankees, due to their common practice of buying World Series titles, unbearable arrogance, and the overall disgust I have for their organization has a whole. Plus, 1999 is a sore spot. 

None of which, by the way, I hold over Jeter in any form whatsoever. He has been the walking definition of greatness and professionalism in the Yankees clubhouse for the past twenty years; loved for his athletic ability and untainted by scandal. 

Jeter, in addition to other Yankee greats such as Mariano Rivera and Jorge Posada, carried the club to championship after championship on the back of their on-field prowess, while navigating the fierce and ugly world of New York City sports media and fandom without losing their souls off the diamond. 

But perhaps, even more importantly than anything else, is the conduct he has held himself to since announcing his looming retirement in the spring. No other departing athlete in recent history has done more to thank his fans or express his appreciation for his ball club than Jeter has done in the Bronx. 

From television commercials to full-page advertisements and the respect he was showered on adoring fans since April, not only in New York but across the county's ballparks, Jeter has established himself as America's Captain; the last living baseball legend we will encounter for a long time to come. 

I heap these praises upon Jeter despite my allegiance to the Atlanta Braves, who produced some of the greatest and more respected ballplayers than any other club during my youth. But Jeter was able to do something more: he was able to retain our faith in the sport through his love of the game. 

Steroid trials? No problem, Jeter was on the highlight reel making a ridiculous throw from shallow left field for the out. The question now is: who do we have left to look forward to? Who do we have to pick up that mantle and revive our faith in baseball's present and future?

Don't feel bad, I couldn't think of anyone either.

With all of that said, I wish my farewell to America's Captain; the last legend. The greatness he exhibited on and off the field will not be recreated anytime soon, nor will the loyalty he held for his team - the only time he ever played for - be seen again in this free-spending era of free agency. 

Nor will I forgive his .353 batting average in the '99 Series, but that is besides the point. 

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1 comments:

Norie61 said...

MAYBE HE CAN BECOME BASEBALL'S AMBASSADOR! AS FAR AS A WORLD SERIES TEAM, EVERY ORGANIZATION WOULD LOOK TO BUY THE BEST, NO ONE SHOULD BE HELD IN CONTEMPT FOR THAT. LOOK AT THE MONEY SPENT ON SOME OF THESE FAILED PLAYERS. IT NEVER FAILS, THE YANKEES CAN SPENT BIG BUCKS ON A PITCHER AND THEY FAIL TO PRODUCE FOR THEM, OR PLAYERS WHO ARE OUT MORE THEN THEY ARE IN.DOES THE 1ST BASEMEN RING A BELL! I'M SURE, IN TIME CAUSE THAT IS WHAT JETER HAD, WE WILL SEE SOME MORE BALL PLAYERS JUST A GOOD AS JETER.BUT I AGREE NOT ONE WITH THE PERSONALITY OR PROFESSIONALISM HE HAS. FAREWELL AND GODSPEED CAPTAIN!

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