A Fond Farewell

Written By Tyler James on 4/27/17 | 4/27/17

Matthew Avitabile approached me in late July 2016 about helping him bring The Schoharie News to print. My grammatically incorrect reply? "Eh."

That is the 100% true, albeit short, story about the beginnings of the current version of The Mountain Eagle. I had heard the reports, about how newspapers were a dying business. My initial reaction was one of skepticism. How could it not be? We might as well open a video store. (If you recently opened a video store, ignore the sarcasm. I'm sure it will be an incredible success.)

I couldn't have been more wrong.

The reason I was wrong is two fold. The first is fairly obvious and straightforward. People can't get local news online. So nationally, smaller papers are doing quite well. The second is the kind of paper we decided to publish. We would focus on the community, sourcing our material directly from the community we serve. If you read TME, you notice the myriad of columnists and contributors we have. We felt that a paper for the people, by the people (yes, I'm aware of the similarity) would be the most effective method of attracting interest.

The results have been astounding. Feedback has shown us that we were on the right track, and that people want a choice. I have been involved in every aspect of this business since the beginning, and I'm proud to say that we have accomplished what we set out to do.

That being said, I will be leaving the newspaper at the end of the week to pursue opportunities elsewhere. My experience working on the paper and for other ventures in this area have been nothing short of amazing, and I want to thank every one of you for welcoming me here with open arms. I will forever be appreciative.

Now, a word about my friend, business partner, and mentee Mathew Avitabile. I've seen the tireless work he puts into this publication first hand. The late nights, early mornings and long days. The point is, he truly cares about making this thing we built a success. Matt wants to be a truthful voice in this region, and stops at nothing to please everyone he encounters. A truly great guy, and I'll miss him.

I won't name everyone, because that would take up way too much space and be tedious at best. Tim Knight, Cathleen Berry, Steve Kowalski, Darlene Patterson, Bill Kinisky, the Mortons, Scott Bennet Jr. and Frank Kovacofsky.

Thank you.


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Why Promotional Products Work

Written By Editor on 4/26/17 | 4/26/17

(Hint: They’re More Than Just Products)

If you, like millions of others, watched this year’s Super Bowl for more than the game, you know the power of advertising backed by money and research; companies pitch brands and slogans that attempt to leave a lasting effect on the consumer. Many like to believe those messages don’t have much impact, but evidence overwhelmingly points to the power of persuasion.

It may be subtle, but persuasion by advertisers shows levels of success that prove television, radio, mobile and digital can—and do—draw consumers to their brands. They must compete not only with each other across traditional and digital media for the hearts, minds and dollars of the consumer, but they must compete with outside stimuli once the consumer walks away from the television, shuts down the computer or drives past a billboard.

What does leave a lasting impression is the promotional product. A $20+ billion industry, promotional products are designed for staying power, and industry research has proven their power as an effective advertising medium.

A PPAI study conducted among travelers at New York’s La Guardia Airport revealed new insights into promotional products’ value and effectiveness. Of the travelers surveyed who could recall receiving a promotional product in the previous 12 months, 88 percent could recall the name of the advertiser and 85 percent have done business with an advertiser as a result of receiving an item.

Imagine being able to craft a message one time, and see that message spread to an audience of hundreds, thousands and even millions. Now imagine that message being delivered by a t-shirt, a pen or a beverage cup. Promotional products professionals work with Fortune 500 companies and top ad agencies to create experiences people love through a product they can actually use.

The same study by PPAI reports that 82 percent of respondents possess at least one and as many as 10 promotional items, with 81 percent keeping them because they are useful. What’s more, 53 percent said they use these products at least once a week and even more—47 percent—said they keep promotional products for more than a year.

Powerhouse advertisers aren’t the only ones who earn a mighty piece of the advertising pie; from mom-and pop to mid-sized companies, promotional products professionals apply research-based technical expertise to deliver the hottest products and production techniques to their clients’ campaigns, improving their reach and boosting their bottom lines as well.

What comes to mind when you think of the color PINK? How about a red lapel ribbon? Or a yellow wristband? Promotional products work because they leave a lasting impression in the hearts, minds and hands of recipients. The messages live on because the products are memorable, unique and personal. They are the only sensory medium that gives the consumer a tangible memory of a relationship to the brand. Promotional products are shown to build communities of like-minded consumers with a shared sense of
brand loyalty.

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The History Behind Why Cobleskill’s Vote is Worth Fifteen Times More Than Blenheim’s

The idea of “one man, one vote” is a treasured concept in modern democracies, as it represents the individual power and responsibility of a citizen.

This concept has no place on the Schoharie County Board of Supervisors, however.

Based off of a demographically configured weighted vote system, the county’s 16 Town Supervisors are each assigned a number of votes that corresponds to the population of their municipality as a percentage of the county’s population as a whole.

For example: while incumbent Cobleskill Supervisor Leo McAllister casts 481 weighted votes as a result of his town’s high population, current Blenheim Supervisor Shawn Smith casts only 33 weighted votes due to his municipality’s sparse population.

This means that even though both men are their township’s highest elected representative on the county board, Mr. McAllister’s vote on any issue carries nearly fifteen times the weight of that of Mr. Smith’s.

With the county board’s 2,974 available weighted votes being divided between the 16 town supervisors based on population, it is mathematically possible for a two-thirds majority of the board to oppose a motion and still have fewer weighted votes than the supervisors representing the five largest towns in the county.

So long as the supervisors of Cobleskill, Middleburgh, Schoharie, Richmondville and Esperance pool their 1,604 weighted votes together on any issue, they have more than the 1,488 vote threshold necessary to approve or disapprove of any motion being considered.

Although this pooling of votes has not always occurred, due to divisions by faction or party, all five towns are currently represented by Republican supervisors who more often than not work together as a whole.

However, it was not always this way, as the county board use to operate under a one town, one vote system until the United States Supreme Court ruled in Reynolds V. Sims that legislative districts could not be based on land area (such as towns in a county, or counties in a state), because densely populated districts were being disenfranchised to the benefit of sparsely populated districts.

When asked for historical context on this issue, Conesville Supervisor Bill Federice told The Mountain Eagle that, “After the courts ruled the one town equals one vote system of county legislative government was unconstitutional the county was faced with the decision of whether to scrap the Board of Supervisors as it was then constructed and set up a legislative body based on equal districts which crossed town lines.”
 
“As a result, the option of creating a county legislative body with districts based on equal population was put to county voters several decades ago and soundly defeated,” continued Federice.

The supervisor added that, “It would appear the voters back in the day preferred the weighted vote to not having a guarantee someone from their town would be their elected representative at the county.”

Which is where the situation stands now more than five decades after the Supreme Court’s initial ruling on the issue resulted in Schoharie County’s weighted vote system that it has today.

Schoharie County Historical Society Spring Meeting at Lansing Manor

Written By Editor on 4/25/17 | 4/25/17


The annual Spring Program Meeting of the Schoharie County Historical Society will be held on Thursday, April 27, at 7 PM at the New York Power Authority’s Visitors Center in North Blenheim.  The public is invited to attend the meeting and visit the Lansing Manor House afterward.
A new operating agreement for the Manor between the Power Authority and the Historical Society was signed earlier this year.  Historical Society Director Carle Kopecky will introduce the Society’s new Director of Educational Outreach Melinda McTaggart, who will now manage the Lansing Manor operations among other duties.  The new agreement means an enhanced role at Lansing Manor, in southern Schoharie County, and with schools in the region.
“Methods of interpreting historic house museums have changed dramatically in the past 20 years” says Mr. Kopecky. “We look forward to exploring ways these new techniques might be introduced at Lansing Manor.” Referring to the popular PBS TV series he adds, “I like to think of it as the Downton Abbey of Schoharie County and we should be presenting it that way!”
Lansing Manor has been restored as needed and maintained by the Power Authority since the 1970s, with the Manor staffed by the Historical Society. "The addition of a new Director of Educational Outreach position is an opportunity for us (NYPA) to work more closely with the society to further interpret this fine piece of local history", said Mario Roefaro Community Relations Manager for NYPA. “We look forward to continuing to promote all that the Schoharie County Historical Society and NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center have to offer to residents and visitors alike.”
Schoharie County Historical Society is in its 128th year at the Old Stone Fort Museum Complex in Schoharie, publishing the semi-annual “Historical Review” of county history, and organizing lectures and historical events such as Stone Fort Days, History Fair and the upcoming Schoharie Street Movies Centennial on June 8 and 10.  More information about the Society, membership and volunteer opportunities, can be found on our website, theoldstonefort.org.
To learn more about visiting NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center and the Lansing Manor Complex please visit http://www.nypa.gov/BGVisitorsCenter.

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The Role of Bad Faith Insurance

Written By Editor on 4/24/17 | 4/24/17

By Michael Ehline

When a driver crashes their car or slips at work, they expect their insurance company to come to their aid. Often insurance policies are expensive and cumbersome. The big insurance companies assure the policyholders of the ironclad nature of their contracts. However, when push comes to shove many are left out in the cold.

Bad faith insurance is a recurring problem for large and small insurance companies alike. However, the larger insurance conglomerates often have the legal resources to fight against their own policyholders. Many states have statutes against bad faith insurance, but they are often hard to prove. Furthermore, the recourse of fighting the big companies as the little guys is difficult. In fact, this is so difficult that many consumers simply give up.

However, accident victims should never give up without a fight. There are plenty of legal recourses available for them. Attorneys that fight for them on commission offer one option. This allows clients to get their time’s worth and only pay if they win the case. It also allows the attorney flexibility in taking on the big insurance company.

Each of these provide different ammunition for the consumer. Their policies often have lofty maximum values and promises the companies simply won’t keep. Understanding the fundamental issues in and around the insurance companies is one major step in the right direction. Having the right lawyer to fight on their behalf is yet another. Research consumer complaints against each insurance carrier before you choose one. You’ll be happy that you took the extra time. No policy is perfect, but the peace of mind knowing you’re truly protected is something that money can actually buy.


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Cobleskill Police Blotter

Monday, April 17, 2017

At 10:20 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Brian J. Lindstadt, 42, of Sharon Springs, NY, for DWI and other vehicle and traffic tickets.  He was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

Thursday April 20, 2017

At 5:57 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Rebecca Sawyer, 31, of Richmondville, NY, for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation 2nd and Suspended Registration.  She was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and remanded to the Schoharie County Jail on $250 Bail / $500 Bond.  She is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on April 25th at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

At 1:00 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Rachel Raiti, 23, of East Berne, NY, for Petit Larceny.  She was issued on an appearance ticket and released.  She is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

At 12:10 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested John D. Miller, Jr., 37, of Cobleskill, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 12:10 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Bambie L. Smart, 37, of Cobleskill, NY, for Trespass.  She was issued an appearance ticket and released. She is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Zachary M. Zimmerman, 21, of Bethel, PA, for Violation of the Village Noise Ordinance.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Bradley E. Knoblauch, 22, of Constableville, NY,  for Violation of the Village Noise Ordinance.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Desirae Almeida, 19, of Sharon Springs, NY, for Trespass.  She was issued an appearance ticket and released.  She is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Nicholas J. Stagliano, 22, of Walker Valley, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

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SUNY Cobleskill Student Dies in Crash

Cobleskill, NY — At approximately 4 a.m. on April 22, six SUNY Cobleskill students were involved in a vehicular incident on Interstate 88 in the town of Maryland, New York. One fatality has been reported. Douglas Alvarez, 19, of Mamaroneck, New York, passed away as a result of his injuries. Douglas was a first-year Business Administration student at SUNY Cobleskill. All other students are either being treated at area hospitals or have been released. Details are emerging. New York State Police are investigating the incident.

President Marion Terenzio and the College extend their deepest sympathy to Douglas’s family, friends and the entire SUNY Cobleskill community in this time of loss. Support and counseling will be available on campus for anyone experiencing distress. Locations and times will be posted within the hour. In case of an emergency or crisis please call University Police at 518-255-5555.

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Schoharie County Historical Society Spring Meeting at Lansing Manor

Written By Editor on 4/21/17 | 4/21/17

Schoharie, NY – The annual Spring Program Meeting of the Schoharie County Historical Society will be held on Thursday, April 27, at 7 PM at the New York Power Authority’s Visitors Center in North Blenheim.  The public is invited to attend the meeting and visit the Lansing Manor House afterward.

Historical Society Director Carle Kopecky will introduce the Society’s new Director of Educational Outreach Melinda McTaggart, who will now manage the Lansing Manor operations among other duties. “Methods of interpreting historic house museums have changed dramatically in the past 20 years” says Mr. Kopecky. “We look forward to exploring ways these new techniques might be introduced at Lansing Manor.” Referring to the popular PBS TV series he adds, “I like to think of it as the Downton Abbey of Schoharie County and we should be presenting it that way!”

Lansing Manor has been restored as needed and maintained by the Power Authority since the 1970s.  The Manor is staffed by the Historical Society. "The addition of a new Director of Educational Outreach position is an opportunity for us (NYPA) to work more closely with the society to further interpret this fine piece of local history", said Mario Roefaro Community Relations Manager for NYPA. “We look forward to continuing to promote all that the Schoharie County Historical Society and NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center have to offer to residents and visitors alike.”

The Schoharie County Historical Society also operates the Old Stone Fort Museum Complex in Schoharie, publishes the semi-annual “Historical Review” of county history, and organizes lectures and historical events such as Stone Fort Days, History Fair and the upcoming Schoharie Street Movies Centennial on June 8 and 10.  More information about the Society, membership and volunteer opportunities, can be found on their website, www.theoldstonefort.org.

To learn more about visiting NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center and the Lansing Manor Complex please visit www.nypa.gov/BGVisitorsCenter.

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Women's Softball Game Rained Out

Written By Editor on 4/20/17 | 4/20/17

The SUNY Cobleskill Department of Sport & Exercise announced today that the women’s softball team’s home North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) doubleheader versus Cazenovia College that was originally scheduled to be played today at Fighting Tiger Park has been cancelled due to field conditions brought on by heavy rains.

This doubleheader will tentatively be made up at a later date based on the two teams’ upcoming schedule availability.

For further information regarding Fighting Tigers athletic team schedule adjustments; interested parties can consult the athletic program’s website at http://fightingtigers.cobleskill.edu or can contact the SUNY Cobleskill Department of Sport & Exercise via phone at (518) 255-5127 weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.  

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Men's College Lacrosse: SUNY Cobleskill Men Lose to Keuka College 19-5 in Conference Action

Keuka Park, N.Y.: The SUNY Cobleskill men’s lacrosse team suffered through a long afternoon on Wednesday falling to the host Wolves of Keuka College by a 19-5 margin in a North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) match-up. With the loss the Fighting Tigers drop to 3-7 overall on the year with a 0-5 record in league play while the Wolves improve to 6-5 overall including a 4-2 record versus conference opponents.
The host Wolves scored the contests first 13 goals to effectively seal the decision taking a 13-0 advantage into the locker room at halftime. Cobleskill would be outshot in the game 46-to-17 by Keuka while committing 27 turnovers on the day.
Once again junior attackman Jeremy Mowrey, Johnstown, N.Y., Johnstown High School/Herkimer Community College, led the Orange & Black offensively with two goals and an assist on the afternoon. The visitors also received solo goals from: freshman attackman Kieran Tierney, Marcellus, N.Y., Marcellus High School, sophomore attackman Sean Degnan, Monroe, N.Y., Monroe-Woodbury High School, and freshman attackman Robert Gioielli, Staten Island, N.Y., Monsignor Farrell High School, to round out their scoring.    
Cobleskill will return to action on Saturday April 22nd when they travel to Cazenovia, N.Y. to face the Wildcats of Cazenovia College in NEAC play beginning at 1:00 p.m.
FINAL GAME BOX:

Lacrosse Box Score (Final)
SUNY Cobleskill vs Keuka College (Apr 19, 2017 at Keuka Park, N.Y.)
 Summary 
SUNY Cobleskill (3-7, 0-5 NEAC) vs. Keuka College (6-5, 4-2 NEAC)
Date: Apr 19, 2017  Attendance: 142
Weather: A good day for ducks
SCORE BY PERIOD  
Total 
SUNY Cobleskill 
Keuka College 
19 
SUNY Cobleskill SCORING: GOALS: Jeremy Mowrey 2; Kieran Tierney 1; Sean Degnan 1; Robert Gioielli 1. ASSISTS: Edwin Martinez 1; Jeremy Mowrey 1.
Keuka College SCORING: GOALS: Mark Shattuck 5; Craig Gerhardt 4; Pat Giardino 3; Andrew Burns 2; Dan Blaessig 2; Robby Miller 1; Connor Tifft 1; Dillon Springer 1. ASSISTS: Craig Gerhardt 3; Dan Blaessig 2; Andrew Burns 2; Pat Giardino 2; Matt Mahalick 1; Mark Shattuck 1.
GOALIES - COBM: John Montaniz 3-7 (60:00 minutes, 31 shots-12 saves,
19 GA); KEUM: Jacob Wood 1-0 (37:35, 3-3, 0) , Kyle Andrake (22:25,8-3, 5).
PENALTIES - SUNY Cobleskill 2/1:00; Keuka College 3/2:30.



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Faso, Maloney in Bipartisan Discussion April 21

Written By Editor on 4/19/17 | 4/19/17


Kingston, NY – Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress will host Representative John Faso (NY-19) and Representative Sean Patrick Maloney (NY-18) for its “Across the Aisle” discussion at Marist College on Friday, April 21 at 9 a.m. Representatives Faso and Maloney will focus on how Washington policies affect the Hudson Valley. Pattern President and CEO Jonathan Drapkin will moderate. For more information on the event, click here. Members of the media are encouraged to attend. Interview and photo opportunities will be available.

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The Cost of Highway Safety

Many parts of safety on the road depend directly on the driver. Each person behind the wheel has a certain responsibility for themselves and those around them. Any distraction or poor judgement could create major issues for passengers and pedestrians.

There is a lot more at play than just driving skills and habits, though. On the one hand, risky behaviors such as drinking and driving, cell phone use, and distracted driving all play a role. Other issues include those that cannot be controlled, including the weather and light conditions. Construction and road conditions are each important issues that lead to accidents and issues. Altogether, these combine to possibly lead to problems down the line.

There is more on the table than just the obvious. Each part of the auto industry and those around it have roles to make our roads safer. Government agencies such as the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, or NHTSA, carry out intensive tests to manage safety for vehicles and drivers. Other agencies work their best to perform similar tasks. Even insurance companies offer special training for motorists and companies to reduce their own exposure to liability. Furthermore, these companies understand the risks involved for their policy holders and wish to avoid as many complicating factors as possible. It makes sense why they would want to do so.

Each issue has its own merits and drawbacks. In fact, these are some of the most common issues on the road regardless of age, geography, and driving experience.

When each part of the machine works together, the risk for the average driver decreases. Even if self driving cars enter into the market, the chance of fatal accidents going to zero is minimal. Regardless, there are a number of responsibilities for all those involved in the ecosystem that is America’s transportation network. What role do you play?

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SUNY's Westridge Named Conference Golfer of the Week

GANSEVOORT, N.Y. – The North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) announced today that SUNY Cobleskill senior Shawn Westridge, Kerhonkson, N.Y., Roundout Valley High School, has been named the league’s Golfer-of-the-Week for the period ending Sunday, April 16th.

The Fighting Tiger senior opened the week by capturing the individual title at the 2017 Keuka College Spring Invitational on Wednesday at the par 72/6663 yard Lakeside Country Club in Penn Yan, N.Y. by firing a round of one-over par 73 to better the field of 52 players. Led by Westridge’s first career college tournament victory, the Fighting Tigers posted a team total of 27-over-par 315 to claim the team title at the event.

Then on Friday the Roundout Valley High School alumnus led the Fighting Tigers to the team title at Cobleskill’s own 2017 Mid Atlantic Classic hosted by the Orange & Black at the par 71/6146 yard Canajoharie Country Club beginning at 11:00 a.m. Westridge placed fourth overall against the 21-player field with a round of nine-over-par 80 as Cobleskill captured the team title with a score of 36-over par 320.

Westridge closed the week at the 2017 SUNY Delhi Spring Invitational hosted by the Broncos at the Par 71/6459 yard College Golf Course in Delhi, N.Y. with a round eight-over-par 80 to place 12th overall in the 22-player field at as Cobleskill posted a team score of 39-over-par 327 to finish in third place overall.

Cobleskill will next be in action when they travel to Huntingdon Valley, Pa. for the 2017 NEAC Championship Tournament hosted by the Lions at the Par 70/6670 yard Philmont Country Club on Saturday April 22nd and Saturday April 23rd.


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Belewich Named Athlete of the Week

The SUNY Cobleskill Department of Sport & Exercise announced today that senior Emily Belewich, Ava, N.Y., Adirondack High School, a member of the women’s outdoor track & field team has been named the athletic program’s Fighting Tiger Athlete-of-the-Week.
The senior hurdler Emily was the team’s top finisher at the 2017 Upstate Classic hosted by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) at the Engineers Renwyck Field in Troy, N.Y. on Saturday placing fourth overall in the 100-hurdles in a New York State College Track Conference (NYSCTC) provisional qualifying time of 17.06 seconds.
The Fighting Tigers will next be in action on Saturday April 22nd when the travel to Albany, N.Y., for the 2017 Spring Classic hosted by the University at Albany at the Great Danes Track & Field Facility beginning at 10:00 a.m.

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Cobleskill Women's Softball Drops Doubleheader

Dallas, Pa.: The SUNY Cobleskill women’s softball team dropped a pair of non-conference contests to the host Cougars of Misericordia University by scores of 16-1 and 11-2. With the losses the Fighting Tigers fall to 2-18 overall on the year while the Cougars improve to 13-15 on the campaign.

In the opener the home team struck for 14 runs in the bottom of the second inning which effectively put the game out of reach.
The Fighting Tigers could manage only five hits in the game with junior shortstop Jaimee Lord, Mechanicville, N.Y., Ballston Spa High School, going 2-for-3 with a double and a RBI.

In the second game the Cougars led 3-2 going into the bottom of the fourth inning when they erupted for eight runs to decide the issue as Cobleskill pitching could not contain them.

The Orange & Black scored their only two runs of the contest in the top of the fourth inning on a double by junior third baseman Hannah Hoffman, Troy, N.Y., Averill Park High School/Hudson Valley Community College, who finished 1-2 at the plate.

Cobleskill will next be in action in North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) play when they travel to Cazenovia, N.Y. on Wednesday, April 19th, for a conference doubleheader beginning at 3:00 p.m.

LINE SCORES:

Misericordia 16, SUNY Cobleskill 1 (Apr 18, 2017 at Dallas, PA) (Game 1)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
SUNY Cobleskill..... 00   1 00 -  1  5  0      (2-17)
Misericordia........ 2(14)0 0X - 16 14  2      (12-15)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Pitchers: SUNY Cobleskill - Sarah Munn; Katerina Weingarten(2). Misericordia - J Hoffman.
Win-J Hoffman(6-3)  Loss-Sarah Munn(1-4)  T-1:30  A-59

Misericordia 11, SUNY Cobleskill 2 (Apr 18, 2017 at Dallas, PA) (Game 2)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
SUNY Cobleskill..... 002 00 -  2  3  0      (2-18)
Misericordia........ 021 8X - 11 12  1      (13-15)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Pitchers: SUNY Cobleskill - Brianna Murphy; Sarah Munn(4). Misericordia - B Moyle.
Win-B Moyle(5-9)  Loss-Brianna Murphy(1-4)  T-1:10  A-79
HR MISB - B Moyle.

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Man Arrested for Narcotics in Richmondville

Written By Editor on 4/18/17 | 4/18/17

State Police in Cobleskill arrested a man following a traffic stop on Interstate 88 in the Town of Richmondville on April 13, 2017. Troopers arrested Caleb M. Neely, age 27 of Olean New York, charging him with one count of Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance 7th. The arrest came following a traffic stop, during the stop further investigation revealed that Neely was in possession of narcotics. Neely was issued an Appearance Ticket to appear in the Town of Richmondville Court on May 3, 2017 at 4:00 PM.

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Middleburgh Man Arrested in Dirtbike Theft

On April 10, 2017 State Police based out of Cobleskill responded to a Burglary complaint in the Town of Middleburgh where a Honda dirt bike was stolen. A joint investigation between the Bureau of Criminal Investigation based in Princetown and the State Police Cobleskill Uniform Road Patrol led to the arrest of Sean A. Sherman, age 25 of Middleburgh, charging him with Burglary 3rd, Criminal Mischief 3rd and Petit Larceny. Sherman who was arrested on April 13, 2017, was arraigned on the charges and remanded to the Schoharie County Correctional Facility in lieu of cash bail. During the course of the investigation the motorcycle was located and returned to the owner. Sherman is due back in the Town of Middleburgh Court on April 19, 2017 at 5:00 PM.


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Walton Police Blotter

04/03/2017 The Walton Police Department arrested Robert L Humphreys, age 56 of Walton on the charge of 2nd Degree Harassment.  He was arraigned in Walton Village Court in front of Judge Hall and remanded to the Delaware County Jail on $250 cash bail.  He is scheduled to reappear on April 17th.

04/04/2017 The Walton Police Department arrested Thomas Evans, age 18 of Walton on the charges of operating a motor vehicle without a valid inspection and a license restriction violation.  He was arraigned in Walton Village Court in front of Judge Hall and remanded to the Delaware County Jail on $250 cash bail or $500 bond.  He is scheduled to reappear on April 17th.

04/08/2017 The Walton Police Department arrested Christina L Davis, age 35 of Walton on the charge of Issuing a Bad Check.  She was issued an Appearance Ticket returnable to Walton Village Court on April 24th.

04/10/2017 The Walton Police Department arrested Tabbatha L Irwin, age 34 of Walton on a Criminal Summons issued by Walton Village Court pursuant to a 2nd Degree Harassment charge.  She is scheduled to appear on April 17th.

04/11/2017 The Walton Police Department arrested Shaun L Provost, age 39 of Walton on the charge of Trespass.  He was issued an Appearance Ticket returnable to Walton Village Court on April 24th.

04/15/2017 The Walton Police Department arrested Victoria Mattiace, age 19 of Unadilla and a 17 year old from Afton, NY on the charge of Unlawful Possession of Alcohol by a person under 21.  They were each issued an Appearance Ticket returnable to Walton Village Court on May 8th.

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Cobleskill Police Blotter

Tuesday April 11th , 2017

At 2:01 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Dwayne H. Dickson, age 24, of Copiague, NY, for

Aggravated Unlicensed Operation of a Motor Vehicle 3 rd degree and 1 other V+T charge. He was

issued traffic tickets to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 2 nd at 4:00 p.m.

At 5:50 p.m., Cobleskill Police arrested Nicole Chase, age 32 of Cobleskill for Unlawful

Possession of Marihuana. She was issued an appearance ticket to appearance ticket to appear in

Cobleskill Town Court on April 25 th , 2017 at 5:00 p.m.

At 9:30 p.m., Cobleskill Police arrested Nicholas J. Stagliano, age 22, of Walker Valley NY for

violation of the Village Noise Ordinance. He was issued an appearance ticket to appear in

Cobleskill Town Court on May 18 th , 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

At 9:30 p.m., Cobleskill Police arrested Bradley E. Knoblauch, age 22, of Constableville, NY

for violation of the Village Noise Ordinance. He was issued an appearance ticket to appear in

Cobleskill Town Court on April 20 th , 2017 at 10:00 a.m.

Thursday, April 13 th , 2017

At 9:24 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Travis V. Willoughby, age 20, of Sharon Springs NY,

for Driving While Intoxicated, Operating a MV with BAC greater than ,08%, and 1 other V+T

charge. He was issued traffic tickets and released. He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on

May 9 th at 5:00 p.m.

At 10:06 p.m., Cobleskill Police arrested Fateem A. Smith, age 22, of Bronx NY for Disorderly

Conduct. He was issued an appearance ticket to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on April 25 th ,

2017 at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 15 th , 2017

At 2:15 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Myles B. Foster, age 21, of Brooklyn NY, for violation

of the Village Noise Ordinance. He was issued an appearance ticket and released.. He is to

return to Cobleskill Town Court on April 20 th at 10:00 a.m.

At 10:50 p.m., Cobleskill Police arrested Charles Hotaling, age 34, of Cobleskill for Criminal

Contempt in the 2 nd degree. He was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and remanded to the

Schoharie County Correctional Facility on $500.00 cash bail or $1500.00 bond. He is to return to

Cobleskill Town Court on April 18 th 2017 at 5:00 p.m. for further action.

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C-GCC's Summer Sessions Feature Online Classes

Written By Editor on 4/17/17 | 4/17/17

Whether they're spending time outdoors or online, college students can get
ahead this summer with a class at Columbia-Greene Community College.

With two summer sessions slated, the college is offering classes in river
ecology as well a host of online courses such as Foundations of Business,
Computer Applications, Western Civilization (5000 BC to1700 AD), American
Government, and Critical Issues in Health, among others. The roster features
a broad selection of both introductory and advanced classes.

"We have a rich selection of courses." said Vice President and Dean of
Academic Affairs Phyllis Carito. "Students enrolled at other colleges can
save significantly by taking a class while they're home for the summer.

"We have interesting electives that can spice up summer study, and students
can learn in air-conditioned classrooms or at the beach, with an online
class."

Introductory classes include: Composition, Sociology, General Psychology and
Job Search Preparation. Meanwhile, advanced classes include such titles as
Creative Writing, Criminal Justice Field Study, Microbiology, Anatomy and
Physiology I and II, Child and Adolescence Psychology, Abnormal Psychology,
and Life Span Development.

A complete schedule of summer classes was mailed to residents of both
Columbia and Greene counties in mid-April. Check C-GCC’s searchable class
schedule at www.mycommunitycollege.com, to see which courses are offered
online.

Summer I runs from May 15 to June 22. Summer II runs from July 10 to Aug.
17. Classes are offered in accelerated schedules during both day and evening
hours, and some start at various times throughout the summer.

An Open Registration Day is scheduled for May 11 (for Summer I and II), from
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Matriculated students can currently begin registering with
their advisors.

In addition, part-time, non-matriculated students can register any weekday,
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., either in person or by telephone (major credit
cards accepted).

For more information, call the Registrar's Office at (518) 828-4181,
extension 5514, or e-mail info@mycommunitycollege.com.

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Accident Leaves Vehicle in Creek

On April 1, ECOs George Wilber and Nathan Doig responded to a motor
vehicle accident in the town of Franklin. The accident was originally
reported as a roll-over into the Ouleout Creek with four people in the
car. The ECOs were the first responders at the scene and determined
that all of the occupants were out of the car and the driver had
sustained only minor injuries to his hand that did not require medical
attention. However, the vehicle was located roughly 500 yards
downstream. The ECOs determined that the incident had occurred while
the operator was fishing. Due to poor weather, the other occupants had
remained in the vehicle while the driver fished, and one of the
passengers had knocked the idling vehicle out of gear, causing it to
roll into to the creek. The three passengers jumped out of the car
before it sunk, and the driver injured his hand while attempting to
stop the runaway car. The Franklin Fire Department oversaw the removal
of the waterlogged vehicle with no environmental damage to the creek.




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College Men's Golf: SUNY Cobleskill Men's Golf Wins Title at 2017 Keuka College Spring Invitational

Written By Editor on 4/12/17 | 4/12/17

Penn Yan, N.Y.:  The SUNY Cobleskill men’s golf team posted one of their most impressive victories in recent program historyWednesday afternoon. In only their second outing of the spring after weather conditions had rendered them idle for almost the entire season, the Fighting Tigers posed an impressive team score of 315 to take the top spot in a well-rounded field of nine teams at the 2017 Keuka College Spring Invitational hosted by The Wolfpack at the par 72/6663 yard Lakeside Country Club. 
The Fighting Tigers were led by senior Shawn Westridge, Kerhonkson, N.Y.,  Roundout Valley High School, posted his first career victory firing a round of one-over par 73 to better the field of 52 players. Cobleskill also received strong outings from sophomore Connor McCarthy, Cobleskill, N.Y., Cobleskill-Richmondville High School, who tied for fifth overall with a round of six-over par 78 and from freshman Mike Parrow, Waterloo, N.Y., Waterloo High School, who fired a round of seven-over par 79 to tie for ninth place.
Cobleskill will next be in action on Friday April 14 when they host the 2017 Mid-Atlantic Classic at the Par 71/6146 yard Canajoharie Country Club beginning at 11:00 a.m.
2017 Keuka College Spring Invitational Standings:
 
 Rank 
 Team
 Total 
 Par 

1st
SUNY Cobleskill
315
+27
t-2nd
Oswego Stat College
322
+34

t-2nd
SUNY Delhi
322
+34

4th
Utica College
325
+37

5th
Hobart College
339
+51

6th
Medaille College
343
+55

7th
Penn College
347
+59

8th
Morrisville State College
352
+64

9th
Keuka College
366
+78

SUNY Cobleskill Individual Scores:   
         
SUNY Cobleskill  
Score
Par
Place
Shawn Westridge
73
+1
1st
Connor McCarthy
78
+6
T-5th
Mike Parrow
79
+7
T-9th
Dylan Mulvihill
85
+13
T-19th
Nate Stanton
96
+24
T-44th


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Hurt in an accident? Search Ehline Law Firm Personal Injury Attorneys, APLC for great info on getting money.

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