Cobleskill Police Blotter

Written By Editor on 1/30/18 | 1/30/18

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

At 10:54 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Shawn M. Stuber, 36, of Cobleskill, NY, for Menacing 2nd, Criminal Mischief, and Criminal Trespass 2nd.  He was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and remanded to the Schoharie County Jail on $10,000 Bail/ $20,000 Bond.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on January 30th at 5:00 p.m.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

At 2:37 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Jennifer L. Wheelock, 47, of Cobleskill, NY, for Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance 7th.  She was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on February 13th at 5:00 p.m.

At 7:32 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Michael P. Jacobchek, 69, of Coram, NY, for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation of a Motor Vehicle.  He was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and remanded to the Schoharie County Jail on $500 Bail / $1500 Bond.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on January 30th at 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, January 28, 2018

At 1:00 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Eric J. Defreitas, 22, of Campbell, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released. He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on February 13th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:00 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Dirk-Jan Kloet, 24, of Cobleskill, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on February 13th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:42 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Ronald L. Stedman, 22, of Schoharie, NY, for DWI.  He was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on February 20th at 5:00p.m.

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Auction Notice: Cangelosi Self Storage in Windham

By reason of default and conducted under the provision of Section #182 of the New York State Lien Law, Cangelosi Self Storage will sell at auction all of the personal property stored by:

Bruce Hotaling, Jr. in Unit #51

at 10:00 am, Thursday February 15, 2018 at the premises of Cangelosi Self Storage, Route 23 and South Street, Windham NY 12496. Cangelosi Self Storage reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to impose a minimum bid.


Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Youth Engagement/Reality Check Coordinator Job Announcement

Written By Editor on 1/29/18 | 1/29/18

The Research Foundation for SUNY at SUNY Cobleskill/Advancing Tobacco Free Communities-Delaware, Otsego and Schoharie Counties is seeking a full-time Youth Engagement/Reality Check Coordinator.

The NYS Department of Health’s Bureau of Tobacco Control provides grant funds to the Research Foundation of SUNY at SUNY Cobleskill to implement Advancing Tobacco Free Communities in Delaware, Otsego and Schoharie Counties (ATFC-DOS). ATFC-DOS educates the community and decision makers, mobilizes community members around problems that tobacco addiction causes, and helps decision makers understand the options they have to address these problems. ATFC-DOS works to prevent and reduce tobacco use through youth action and community engagement to change the community environment to support New York State’s tobacco-free norm.  Efforts focus on reducing youth exposure to harmful tobacco marketing in retail settings, decreasing exposure to secondhand smoke in outdoor areas and multi-unit housing, and reducing smoking imagery in the media. Reality Check youth advocates have been working across New York State since 2001 to educate community leaders and their peers about the tobacco industry’s manipulative tactics to recruit youth to become the next generation of replacement smokers.



In collaboration with the Program Director and Community Engagement Coordinator, the Youth Engagement/Reality Check (RC) Coordinator assists with development, implementation and reporting of work plan initiatives and meeting program deliverables consistent with NYS Bureau of Tobacco Control’s (BTC) goals. Responsible for day-to-day operations of youth action program interfacing with youth, community members, elected officials, organizations and decision makers at every level. Recruit, engage and motivate youth in tobacco control initiatives and help coordinate recruitment, education and recognition events. Participate in regional and statewide meetings, BTC trainings and professional development opportunities.



Salary: $45,000 - $50,000 commensurate with education and experience. 



Required Qualifications:

Education: BA/BS in education, youth development, public health, human services or related discipline
2-3 years of experience in youth development and/or working with youth relevant to the role of the position
Ability to meet acceptable background check requirements
Ability to work flexible hours which may include evenings and/or weekends, as appropriate to implement community education events and youth advocacy efforts
Knowledge of strategic planning and ability to develop, implement, manage and evaluate programs, materials and activities to meet work plan deliverables
Knowledge of youth development principles and ability to motivate and empower youth ages 13-18 to become leaders and advocates 
Ability to communicate effectively with community members, stakeholders and decision-makers through oral, written and visual channels
Ability to write press releases and media alerts and promote program through social, print and other media outlets
Strong interpersonal and public relations skills with proven ability to work effectively with community and business leaders, organizational allies, local government reps and state officials
Knowledge of public health issues and policies and tobacco control initiatives


Preferred Qualifications:

Master’s Degree in education, youth development, public health, human services or related discipline
Knowledge of the geography, demographics and unique needs of three-county region


How to Apply:

Submit a cover letter, resume and official college transcripts by 2/16/18 to wegnerl@cobleskill.edu. Job application materials may also be mailed to Advancing Tobacco Free Communities, 125 Schenectady Ave., #005 Old Gym, Cobleskill, NY 12043 postmarked on or before 2/16/2018.



Only those individuals selected for interviews will be contacted.



Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Cobleskill Man Arrested after Pursuit

On January 24th, 2018, the New York State Police in Cobleskill arrested Shawn M. Stuber, age 36, from Cobleskill, NY for Unlawfully Fleeing a Police Officer in a Motor Vehicle 3rd, Resisting arrest and numerous Vehicle and Traffic Offenses.   Stuber was observed operating a vehicle where he committed a traffic violation on State Route 30 in the Town of Fulton and subsequently failed to pull over for the violation.  Stuber was arrested after a short vehicle pursuit, where he then fled on foot until he was apprehended.  Stuber was processed and turned over to the Village of Cobleskill Police for a warrant on unrelated charges.

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Kira Weaver Named to Spring 2017 Dean's List at SUNY Oneonta

Kira Weaver of Gilboa, NY, was among 1,534 SUNY Oneonta students who earned Dean's List honors for the fall 2017 semester. To qualify for the Dean's List, a student must earn a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher while carrying a course load of 12 hours or more.

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

C-GCC Dean's List Announced for Fall 2017 Semester

Written By Editor on 1/24/18 | 1/24/18

Columbia-Greene Community College President James R. Campion and Acting Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs Carol M. Doerfer have announced the President's and Dean's lists, respectively, for the fall 2017 semester.

The distinction of Dean’s List is awarded for a grade point average of 3.25 or higher. President’s List is awarded for a minimum grade point average of 3.75. A matriculated student, full or part-time, who demonstrates either of the above levels of achievement during any given semester, will automatically be placed on the Dean’s or President’s List for that semester. To qualify for these honors, the student must complete a minimum of six semester hours of college-level courses that earn quality points toward their GPA. The student must have no failures, repeats, or incomplete grades within the semester under consideration.

The following students have been named to the President's list:

Jennifer A. Giordano and Carlene M. Palmer-Palmateer, both of Acra;

Juliana R. Tatro of Ancram;

Sarah M. Mason of Ancramdale;

Jennifer A. Ames, Jessica A. Finnegan, Troy D. Lynch and ManDrake E. Vermilyea, all of Athens;

August J. Cuti, Erica S. Delong, Skylar E. Flouton, Alany Gomez, Shannon E. Murphy, Daniel J. Ott and Melissa R. Sangi, all Cairo;

Brooke S. Baum, Daniel P. Byas, Benedetto G. Calcavecchia II, Sidnee S. Centeno, Warren V. Graff, Truc Lien T. Huynh, Jake G. Jensen, Francis V. Kearse, Jason Li, Diana L. Lobdell, Jeffrey Macholdt, John H. McClung, Holli M. McLaughlin, Miriam Quintana Vargas, Isaiah Russell, Riannon S. Vincent, Aaliyah J. Warner, Angeline White and Anthony R. Williams, all of Catskill;

Valerie L. Hammond and Julianna M. Potter, both of Chatham;

Emily R. Foutch of Churchtown;

Mykel L. Blanks of Claverack;

Kiana Kipp and Lori Kipp, both of Clermont;

Katharine Fallon and Erin E. Sturgis-Pascale, both of Copake;

Amy E. Balint, Katelyn M. Bennett, Erika Y. Burke, Anthony J. Burnell, Jessica DelVescovo and Alli Kohlmeyer, all of Coxsackie;

Sara N. Repko, Craryville; Eric W. Von Schilgen of Cropseyville;

Timothy Leach of Delmar;

Ryan Ledee of Durham;

Julianna F. Sroka of Earlton;

Marissa N. Brevoort of East Chatham;

Katherine M. Byrne and Christopher J. Clark, both of East Durham;

Alicia M. Liuzzi of East Greenbush;

Monica A. Abreu, Kayla B. Duntz, Suzanne M. Morris, Tiffany M. Ogden, Jacob Provo and Andrew V. Romano, all of Elizaville;

Erin A. Crawley, Randall E. Schmollinger and Natasha D. Zacchio, all of Freehold;

Alexandria P. Braidt, Eliza M. Cort Watson, Alexandra C. Fingar, Tyler J. Hoffman, Gianna M. Mollo, Tyler Mortenson and Phyllis A. Normand, all of Germantown;

Kathryn R. Kraham, Rachel L. Nielsen and Victoria A. Zidel, all of Ghent;

Alexis Rivera and Gabriela Rosado, both of Glasco;

Kristopher M. Cafaldo, Thomas Ernst, Colin P. Menzynski, Ariana M. Messina and Gabrielle E. O'Neill, all of Greenville;

Randy J. Dunham of Haines Falls;

Allison E. Potter of Hannacroix;

Lydia W. Bjorkman and Nikita N. Bradford, both of Hillsdale;

Ellen E. Boothroyd, Lauren M. Bowes, Leigh-Ann Brash, Kindra Chiappinelli, Megan A. Clark, Jennifer D. Cukerstein, Roxanne P. Dancer, Brandis N. Dean, Joseph W. Everts, Nicole Florio, Rebecca L. Grey, Sarah H. Holbrook, Witness Joseph, Julie V. Klugo, Elizabeth Krikelis, Lauren N. Martin, Virginia Mueller, Amanda Mummery, Elizabeth T. Runyon, Deborah M. Tibensky and Ashley E. Vohrer, all of Hudson;

Erin G. Wilson of Hyde Park;

Alesha I. Brodhead, Patrick J. Donahue, Maria Iqbal, Jennifer Villa and Kayla Wesolowski, all of Kingston;

Fayline L. Williams of Lake Katrine;

Brandon C. Pinelli and Adrianna J. VanAlstyne, both of Leeds;

Gavin Colwell of Livingston;

Jeffrey B. Vining of Maplecrest;

Nichole K. Rosen of Marlboro;

Rebecca U. Therrien of Medusa;

Emily E. Hofstetter, Emily J. Montague and Kayla L. Simmons, all of Mellenville;

Rachel L. Arnwine of Middleburgh;

Jamie L. Peters of Middletown;

Samantha Fletcher of Millerton;

Michael J. Gubler and Olivia N. Shaffer, both of Nassau;

Katrina N. Kormanik of Newtown;

Tasceia A. Clarke of Old Chatham;

Skyler R. Bullard, Suzanne C. Cantelmo, Jessica L. Hill, Samantha D. Kulcsar and Shannon M. McNeff, all of Palenville;

Serena L. Race of Philmont;

Hoa T. Nguyen of Poughkeepsie;

Russ E. McCabe of Purling;

Morgan C. Bogardus and Carissa J. Van Alstyne, both of Ravena;

Catherine Gomm, Jessica L. Ljutich, Fawn L. Shaffer and Heather L. Stary, all of Red Hook;

Alyssa M. Martin of Rexford;

Ronny W. Burdewick, Nylah Interrante and Anne Schaffer, all of Round Top;

Christine M. Dempsey, Jake M. Grimaldi, Molly C. Speirs, Johna A. Valk, Catherine L. Wilson and Rachel A. Wood, all of Saugerties;

Lauren Scott of Selkirk;

Tyler Conley of Stanfordville;

Alexandra Mercer of Stockport;

Shelby L. Rideout of Stottville;

Mary J. Tracy of Tannersville;

Shakira A. Boel, Lynn E. Dougherty, Austin J. Haley-Berry, Tori V. Popp and Deisi Sola, all of Tivoli.

Alyssa A. Lawrenson of Troy;

Riley P. Werner and Casey S. Winner, both of Valatie;

Mark J. Randazzo of West Coxsackie;

Vanessa Abbinante of Willow;

Adam Pitt of Windham.



Student's named to the Dean's List include:

Andrew O. Chiesa, Russ Gray, April M. Reddington and Danel J. Rippel, all of Acra;

Jessica M. Houghtaling of Alcove;

Cory L. Chinn and Christina S. Musarra, both of Amenia;

Joseph A. Barnum Jr., of Ashland;

Dale Adams, Tamara S. Canelli, Jaclyn E. Chiudina, Cody J. Hall, James P. Murphy and Julianna H. Trombley, all of Athens;

Dylan A. Auger, Rebecca L. Biegel, Amanda L. Dudley, Maryann Dykeman, Michael P. Lupoli Jr., Michael R. Serrano, Patricia E. Skinner, Nina Sommer, Matt J. Ware and Jeremy R. Woodell, all of Cairo

Joelle Dean and Megan Grandinetti, both of Castleton;

Michael J. Casaregola Jr., Adrienne Clark, Jessica Coleman, Max S. Dancer, Chloe M. Edgington, Marisa N. Ewing, Kiayra M. Lee, Madison R. Leibowitz, Timothy J. Milano, Jessica N. Mungo, Ashlei L. Saldana and Mikayla C. Weeks, all of Catskill;

Elizabeth S. Ernst, Madison M. Ford, Aaron Kipp, Lily G. Schmitt and Alexa L. Wilson, all of Chatham;

Tate M. Dusenbery, Shane L. McNally and Melissa Nedwell, all of Claverack.

Sarah J. Juzapavicus and Dominick Tarsia, both of Climax;

Cheyenne L. Bosko, Hunter Goodacre and Mara N. Smith, all of Copake;

Tahira S. Ashraf, Elijah C. Chewens and Samantha L. Mccarten, all of Coxsackie;

Peter J. Campbell and Lisa A. Covey, both of Craryville;

Matthew Ballard and Sara M. Biegel, both of Earlton;

Kera D. Hunt and John Rohan, both of East Durham;

Austin P. Arsenault, Vilhjal Campbell, Samantha M. Lauria and Imani Maitland, all of Elizaville.

Daniella K. Weinschreider of Elmont;

Lucas T. Foster, Mary Jane Ientile, Logan J. Mead, Lily M. Palmieri and Alyssa N. Pasco, all of Germantown;

Joshua Battaglia, Melissa A. Davis, Mackenzie Finck, Schuyler J. Makas, Courtney Mashaw and Karly Rothvoss, all of Ghent;

Ravin S. Williams, Glasco; Krista Sabarre, Glenmont; David J. Phillips, of Gloversville;

Justine N. Albin, Kaela L. Koerner, Brie S. Statham and Madisyn Woods-Heath, all of Greenville.

Isaac H. Potter of Hannacroix;

Gurleen Cheema, Brittany L. Hay, Timothy J. Roberts, Tanya Schnackenberg and Brianna R. Van Alphen, all of Hillsdale;

Mohammad Basit, Caitlin H. Cowan, Nicole M. Cozza, Thao N. Doan, Evan M. Foutch, Louiedell S. Gargantiel, Michaela M. Gomula, Roberta J. Hapeman, Laura B. Hoysradt-Wheeler, Karen M. Hunt, Michael J. Ianiro, Widnick Joseph, Kimberlee Kinsman, Joshua P. Moon, Jennifer L. Moore, Brianna B. O'Leary, Olivia K. Otty, Erick H. Reyna, Ashli M. Riggins, Justin C. Smith, Stacey M. Smith, Emily G. Stone, Jennifer M. Taylor, Eliza M. Tkacy, Marguerite A. Vargas, Jason A. Vernon, Stephen R. Walsh Jr. and Jason H. White, all of Hudson.

John P. Tomaine of Hyde Park;

Haley J. Hickman, Justine M. Murphy and Phillip J. Proper, all of Kinderhook;

Africa C. Douglas, Rannisha Hagley, Kate Kristiansen, Sarah Malone and Anna K. Zuvic, all of Kingston;

Kelly E. Hunter of Lake Katrine;

Rhiannon R. Apjohn and Lyndsey A. Orin, both of Leeds;

Jared Rifkind of Maplecrest;

Rebecca L. Butler of Milan;

Beth M. Caddell, Klaudyna L. Graczkowski, Ashley L. Judson, Laura Kramarz and Morgan E. Moore, all of Millerton;

Chantelle Smith, Milton; Alysha M. Lauster, of North Chatham;

Matthew Cotton, Olivia L. Pagano and Eric W. White, all of Palenville;

Rachael C. Beaumont, Desiree A. Graziano and Cory M. Morelock, all of Philmont;

Linzey Pugliese of Port Ewen;

Karam Sawaqed of Poughkeepsie;

Amanda C. Atkinson of Preston Hollow;

Sabrina L. Maynard of Purling;

Neville A. Tonge and Melanie Zelno, both of Ravena.

Tracy M. Beers, Olivia D. Bernard, Altaira M. Calen, Katie J. Drummond Andrew M. Guerrino, Alexandria Jerro-Greco, Christopher J. Kahle, Marist Parr, Katherine M. Quirk and Gabrielle N. Reath, all of Red Hook;

Dana Bell, Lorna E. Kessler and Kristen L. McGilvray, all of Rhinebeck;

Carmine J. Galtieri of Round Top

Kailee E. Cornelison, Madelyn Duvall, Anthony R. Fabiano, Nathaniel R. Lewis, Kiara R. Petramale, Lauren E. Rexford, Daniel M. Sachar, Ashley J. Vernon and Rosemary Whitaker, all of Saugerties;

Amanda M. Bowman of South Westerlo;

Sara S. Altomer, Stockport; Daniel J. Repko and Michael J. Rice, both of Stuyvesant;

Tawni L. Vanamerongen of Surprise;

Sean M. Berry of Tivoli;

John C. Welch Jr., of Ulster Park;

Kathryn S. Carpenter, Catherine L. Leonard and Sarah J. Shook, all of Valatie.

John D. Bougourd of Vernon;

Nicole M. Richards of Wassaic;

Amy G. Batza of West Coxsackie;

Michelle G. Soffos of West Hurley;

and Jordan T. Akey of Wingdale.



Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

E-Cig Use is Skyrocketing among NYS Youth

Written By Editor on 1/23/18 | 1/23/18

The good news is that due to tobacco control measures, the current smoking rate among adults in New York State is 14.2 percent. Unfortunately, the bad news is that the percent of New York State youth who have ever tried and currently use e-cigarettes doubled from 2014 to 2016 according to recently released data in the NYS Youth Tobacco Survey. Electronic cigarettes and similar devices (also referred to as e-cigarettes, vape pens, mods, and e-hookahs) are the most frequently used tobacco products among New York State youth. E-cigarettes typically deliver nicotine, flavorings and other additives to users via an inhaled aerosol.

Among middle school students, the rate increased from 6.9 percent to 14.1 percent and among high school students, the rate increased from 21.6 percent to 43.8 percent. The percent of youth who currently use e-cigarettes and similar devices, defined as past-30-day use, also doubled from 2014 to 2016. Among middle school students, the rate increased from 3.2 percent to 6.4 percent and among high school students it increased from 10.5 percent to 20.6 percent.

E-cigarette use among youth is a major public health concern. Nicotine is addictive and has lasting consequences for youth brain development including impaired cognitive functioning and the development of addiction pathways in the brain. Studies confirm that e-cigarette use among youth is associated with both intention to smoke cigarettes and subsequent cigarette smoking among adolescents and young adults. Smoking remains the number one cause of preventable death and disease locally, statewide and across the nation. The smoking rates in the Delaware, Otsego and Schoharie region are 22.9 percent for Delaware County, 26.3 percent for Otsego County and 19.3 percent for Schoharie County.

In 2017, Advancing Tobacco Free Communities conducted a telephone-based survey of people in Delaware, Otsego and Schoharie Counties in cooperation with applied psychology majors at SUNY Cobleskill. 40 to 45 percent of survey respondents across all three counties felt they did not know enough about e-cigarettes/vape pens to say whether they thought they were more or less harmful than regular cigarettes. 31 percent of those sampled believed that e-cigarettes/vape pens were equally as harmful as regular combustible tobacco; however, 13 percent of the sample felt that e-cigarettes/vape pens were less harmful than smoking regular cigarettes.

The U.S. Surgeon General reports that the use of products containing nicotine in any form among youth and young adults, including e-cigarettes, is unsafe. The U.S. Surgeon General has also concluded that e-cigarette aerosol can contain harmful and potentially harmful substances, including nicotine. E-cigarette products can also be used as a delivery system for to marijuana and other illicit drugs. The nicotine in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products can prime young brains for addiction to other drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine.

Almost all e-cigarette products sold in convenience stores and similar retail outlets contain nicotine. With or without nicotine, e-cigarettes are not hazard-free and the inhaled emission may contain heavy metals, volatile organic compounds, and other toxic chemicals. E-cigarettes are available in a wide variety of flavors, including many that are particularly appealing to youth. More than 85 percent of e-cigarette users ages 12-17 use flavored e-cigarettes, and flavors are the leading reason for youth use.

“We know that secondhand e-cigarette aerosol is not harmless,” said Brian King, Ph.D., M.P.H., deputy director for research translation in Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) Office on Smoking and Health. “It’s critical to protect our nation’s youth from this preventable health risk.”

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

The Ice Harvest Festival at Hanford Mills Museum is February 3, 2018

Written By Editor on 1/21/18 | 1/21/18

Annual festival offers hands-on history and winter fun

[January 21, 2018 East Meredith, NY] Hanford Mills Museum will hold the Ice Harvest Festival on Saturday, February 3. Adults and children can take part in a traditional ice harvest using historic tools and techniques. Before refrigeration, cutting ice from frozen ponds and rivers was an essential winter activity. The ice was stored in ice houses until it was needed in the warmer months to keep food and milk cold.

Photo credit: Jonathan Ment Photography


The Ice Harvest Festival, which will run from 10 am to 3 pm, also features ice carving by the SUNY Delhi Hospitality Center Ice Team, horse-drawn sleigh rides, a snowman village, hot soup buffet, blacksmithing demonstrations, and exhibits by local businesses and farmers. In addition, volunteers from the Dave Brandt Chapter of Trout Unlimited will give children the chance to ice fish, with all equipment provided.

The Ice Harvest Festival began in 1989 with about 75 people and now regularly brings 1,200 or more people to the small hamlet of East Meredith in Delaware County. Since December, Museum staff have been monitoring and grooming the ice to ensure a good crop of clear strong ice.

“It’s a very family-friendly event. Some people who came as children are now bringing their own children,” says Museum Executive Director Liz Callahan. “People value the opportunity to take part in an authentic experience and to connect with the region’s history. It is wonderful to see so many people join together to fill the ice house.” She said that they expect to harvest between 7-8 tons of ice. She also credits her staff and the  dozens of volunteers who make sure the event runs safely and smoothly.

The ice harvested at the festival will be used to make ice cream at the Museum’s Independence Day Celebration on July 4.

The Hot Soup Buffet will feature soup from area restaurants, including Alex’s Bistro, Alfresco’s Italian Bistro, Autumn Cafe, B-Side Ballroom, Blue Bee Cafe, Brook’s House of BBQ, Cafe Ommegang, the Cooperstown Diner, Cross Roads Cafe, Delhi Diner, Denny’s, Depot Restaurant & Tavern, Jackie’s Restaurant, Jay’s Place, Lucky Dog Cafe, Oneonta Bagel Company, the Otesaga, Signatures Restaurant, Simply Thai, Sloan’s NY Grill, the SUNY Delhi Hospitality Program, the Tulip and the Rose Cafe, TK’s Diner, and Undercover Eggplant.

Gwen Deysenroth of Byebrook Farm in Bloomville has exhibited at the Ice Harvest Festival for years. "The Hanford Mills Ice Harvest is a rare chance to see and participate in what was a common work bee 100 plus years ago. The smiles I've seen on the faces of people of all ages prove this is a fun event too. I highly recommend it," she says. She will be offering tastings and selling her farm’s Gouda cheese. Other local products featured at the Ice Harvest Festival are hand-knit Swedish-style mittens and hats from Catharina Kessler of Promisedland Farm in East Meredith, hand-crafted spirits from the Cooperstown Distillery, and coffee, hot chocolate and lattes from the Cabana Coffee truck.

The Ice Harvest Festival is sponsored by the SUNY Delhi Hospitality Management Department, The Daily Star, and Five Star Subaru.

See the website for more information, hanfordmills.org.

Admission and Information

Children 12 and under receive free admission. Admission for adults and teens is $9; senior admission is $7. AAA and other discounts available. Museum members receive free admission. Those living in zip codes (13757, 13739, 13786, 13750, and 13806) neighboring Hanford Mills also receive free admission.

Because GPS may take drivers on roads that are not winter-friendly, the Museum has a list of suggested routes available at http://www.hanfordmills.org/visit-a-historic-workingmill/our-location or by calling 607/278-5744. In particular, when driving from the Albany area on Interstate 88, they recommend taking exit 16 (Emmons/West Davenport) instead of exit 18 or 19.

About Hanford Mills Museum

Hanford Mills Museum operates an authentic water- and steam-powered historic site, which includes a sawmill, gristmill and woodworking shop. The mission of Hanford Mills Museum is to inspire audiences of all ages to explore connections among energy, technology, natural resources and entrepreneurship in rural communities with a focus on sustainable choices. The museum, which is listed on the National and New York State Registers of Historic Places, will open for the 2018 season on May 16.

Hanford Mills is located at 51 County Highway 12 in East Meredith, at the intersection of Delaware County Routes 10 & 12, just 10 miles from Oneonta, and 15 miles from Delhi.  For more information, visit www.hanfordmills.org or call 607-278-5744.

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

NYPA Visitors Center Celebrates More Free Family Fun In 2018

Written By Editor on 1/16/18 | 1/16/18

NORTH BLENHEIM—The New York Power Authority’s (NYPA) admission-free Blenheim-Gilboa Pumped Storage Power Project visitors center attracted more than 25,000 visitors in 2017 and is gearing up to make its 2018 annual roster of special events bigger and better than ever.

In addition to the visitors center’s regular schedule of special events, there will be several events planned with Mine Kill State Park as a partner, including Snowfest on Feb. 10, the Winter Wildlife Program on March 10, and Halloween Events from Oct. 19-21. Other exciting events for the upcoming year include the Pow Wow and Mountain Men event on June 9 and 10, respectively, and STEM camp for kids—highlighting the fields of science, technology, engineering and math—from Aug. 7-9.

For a complete calendar of 2018 events, call the visitors center at 1-800-724-0309 or visit https://www.nypa.gov/calendar.

The Blenheim-Gilboa visitors center is a community resource with a conference room, theatre and picnic pavilion. It hosts hundreds of students from the local public school districts who participate in the education programs.



Visitors can enjoy a wide array of hands-on displays and energy exhibits at the visitors center, which presents information on the basics of electricity, uses of electricity and the operation of New York’s largest pump-storage hydroelectric power project. The visitors center also presents free workshops and lectures on reducing energy use, the environment and history that are announced throughout the year at www.nypa.gov.

Part of the visitors center complex is historic Lansing Manor, a classic example of Federalist period architecture, built by John TenEyck Lansing Jr., a major figure in New York State politics and government. The house is owned by NYPA and is open from May through October. Lansing Manor is also gearing up for some exciting events in 2018, including Victorian Tea on Aug. 4 and the Haunted History Tour on Oct. 21.

Both the visitors center and Lansing Manor are admission-free and open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The visitors center is about an hour from Albany, two hours from Binghamton, and less than two hours from Poughkeepsie.

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Registration for Bright Hill Winter/Spring Literary Workshops for Kids & Bright Kids Book Club Open Now!


Workshop Kids Writing in the BH Community Library
Treadwell, NY -  Bright Hill Press & Bright Hill Literary Center of the Catskills, located at 94 Church Street, Treadwell, NY, announces its 25th annual Winter Literary Workshops for Kids Program and its Winter/Spring Bright Kids Book Club meetings.

Bright Hill's Winter/Spring Literary Workshops for Kids Program opens Feb. 3. The three workshops include the following:

1.  "UNDER & OVER THE FROZEN WORLD: NORDIC SCIENCE, STORIES, & POEMS IN THREE DIMENSIONS" -  Special Middle-School and Grades 9th & 10th Program - Three Saturdays - 9 am - 2:30 pm, Feb. 3, 10, & 17. We will read and study ancient Norse Mythology, including the tales of Odin, Thor, Loki, Freya, and Yggdrasil, the Tree of life. Students will write their own legends and design and build, with the 3-dimensional printer, creatures and characters. On the last day we will present our projects to parents and friends. The cost is $90.  Registration is limited to 12 students.(Delaware Academy students, full scholarships; full and partial scholarships for Delaware and Otsego County students). 
Workshop Kids Learning How to Use the 3-D Printer.
2.  "BIRDS & BEASTS IN THE CATSKILLS WINTER: HOW DO THEY DO IT?" - Ages 6 - 14 - Five consecutive days, Feb. 19 - 23, 9 am - 2:30 pm. We will learn about the animals and birds that live in the Catskills in the winter, including how they survive in harsh conditions. We will take walking trips around Treadwell to find tracks and other signs of winter life, then make kinetic toys: zoetropes, phenakistoscopes, and praxinoscopes with stories, poems, and riddles about the creatures. On the last day we will present our projects to parents and friends. Cost: $120 (Delaware Academy students, full scholarships; full and partial scholarships for Delaware and Otsego County students). 

3.  "BEOWULF & OTHER ANGLO-SAXON TALES & RIDDLES FOR TODAY" - Ages 6 - 14 - Five consecutive days, March 26 -30, 9 am - 2:30 pm. We will watch a Beowulf video based on Bertha Rogers's translation and production of Beowulf (the only epic poem in Anglo-Saxon), then choose characters (Beowulf, Grendel, the dragon, etc.) and objects (swords, shields) to study and create in words, papier mache, and pop-ups.We will learn to recite excerpts from the Beowulf epic in Anglo-Saxon and present our projecs and recitations to parents and friends. Cost: $120 (Delaware Academy students, full scholarships; full and partial scholarships for Delaware and Otsego County students). 

Registration is now open for all three workshops; for registration forms, click here.All Bright Hill Literary Workshops include a focus on S(science), T(technology), E(engineering), A(arts), and M(mathematics); and include writing and visual arts, as well as use of the Bright Hill Community Library and BHLC SMARTBoard. Children ages 6-14 are eligible for Workshops 2 & 3; middle-school and 9th and 10th grade students are eligible for the "Under & Over the Frozen World" program. Workshops are led by Bertha Rogers, Master Teaching Artist. There is a fee, but Bright Hill also offers full and partial scholarships to permanent residents of Delaware and Otsego Counties.
For registration forms and more information click here or  call 607-829-5055, write to BHC, 94 Church Street, Treadwell, NY 13846, visit the organization's website, Bright Hill Press or e-mail Bright Hill at  wordthur@stny.rr.com.



And coming up - SUMMER WORKSHOPS AT BHLC! (Pre-Registration Now Available; details to follow)



Bright Hill's 2018, 26th anniversary programs are made possible by grants from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; Otis  A. Thompson; A. Lindsay and Olive B. O'Connor; A.C. Molinari; Dewar, and Tianaderrah Foundations; Stewart's Shops; the Abraham Kellogg Education Fund; the Delaware Youth Bureau, through the auspices of the New York State Office of Children and Family Services; the Delaware National Bank of Delhi, Delaware County Office of Economic Development, and with the support of Bright Hill's members and friends.  
       Bright Hill's facilities include the Bright Hill Community Library, home to more than 12,000 books and literary and art periodicals that may be borrowed by local residents; the complete catalog is online.  The NYSCA Literary Map of new York State and The NYSCA Literary Tree. The organization and library are located at 94 Church Street, Treadwell, NY 13846. Contact 607-829-5055 or wordthur@stny.rr.com for more information.   

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Research Foundation Seeking Youth Engagement Coordinator for Reality Check

The Research Foundation for SUNY at SUNY Cobleskill/Advancing Tobacco Free Communities-Delaware, Otsego and Schoharie Counties is seeking a full-time Youth Engagement/Reality Check Coordinator.

The NYS Department of Health’s Bureau of Tobacco Control provides grant funds to the Research Foundation of SUNY at SUNY Cobleskill to implement Advancing Tobacco Free Communities in Delaware, Otsego and Schoharie Counties (ATFC-DOS). ATFC-DOS educates the community and decision makers, mobilizes community members around problems that tobacco addiction causes, and helps decision makers understand the options they have to address these problems. ATFC-DOS works to prevent and reduce tobacco use through youth action and community engagement to change the community environment to support New York State’s tobacco-free norm. Efforts focus on reducing youth exposure to harmful tobacco marketing in retail settings, decreasing exposure to secondhand smoke in outdoor areas and multi-unit housing, and reducing smoking imagery in the media. Reality Check youth advocates have been working across New York State since 2001 to educate community leaders and their peers about the tobacco industry’s manipulative tactics to recruit youth to become the next generation of replacement smokers.

In collaboration with the Program Director and Community Engagement Coordinator, the Youth
Engagement/Reality Check (RC) Coordinator assists with development, implementation and reporting of work plan initiatives and meeting program deliverables consistent with NYS Bureau of Tobacco Control’s (BTC) goals. Responsible for day-to- day operations of youth action program interfacing with youth, community members, elected officials, organizations and decision makers at every level. Recruit, engage and motivate youth in tobacco control initiatives and help coordinate recruitment, education and recognition events.

Participate in regional and statewide meetings, BTC trainings and professional development opportunities.

Salary: $45,000 - $50,000 commensurate with education and experience.
Required Qualifications:
 Education: BA/BS in education, youth development, public health, human services or related
discipline
 2-3 years of experience in youth development and/or working with youth relevant to the role of the
position

 Ability to meet acceptable background check requirements
 Ability to work flexible hours which may include evenings and/or weekends, as appropriate to
implement community education events and youth advocacy efforts
 Knowledge of strategic planning and ability to develop, implement, manage and evaluate programs,
materials and activities to meet work plan deliverables
 Knowledge of youth development principles and ability to motivate and empower youth ages 13-18
to become leaders and advocates
 Ability to communicate effectively with community members, stakeholders and decision-makers
through oral, written and visual channels
 Ability to write press releases and media alerts and promote program through social, print and other
media outlets
 Strong interpersonal and public relations skills with proven ability to work effectively with
community and business leaders, organizational allies, local government reps and state officials
 Knowledge of public health issues and policies and tobacco control initiatives
Preferred Qualifications:
 Master’s Degree in education, youth development, public health, human services or related discipline
 Knowledge of the geography, demographics and unique needs of three-county region
How to Apply:
Submit a cover letter, resume and official college transcripts by 2/16/18 to wegnerl@cobleskill.edu. Job
application materials may also be mailed to Advancing Tobacco Free Communities, 125 Schenectady Ave.,
#005 Old Gym, Cobleskill, NY 12043 postmarked on or before 2/16/2018.
Only those individuals selected for interviews will be contacted.

Job Training Offered for Seniors

Are you unemployed, age 55+ and looking for work?

Associates for Training and Development administers the Senior Community Service
Employment Program (SCSEP) grant, which helps mature people get back into the workforce by
providing paid occupational skills and workplace experience training. We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

Geared specifically for income-qualified workers age 55+, the purpose of SCSEP is to provide
training and skill-building opportunities to program participants while providing much needed
community service to local non-profits and public agencies. Some examples of where you might
train are: hospitals, day-care centers, senior centers, schools, town clerks, museums and more.
These agencies provide job skills training and help you in your job search efforts.  In addition to
on-site training, each program participant receives career assessments, technology skills
updates, supportive services, and career counseling.

If you are looking to train for available jobs, learn updated job search skills and connect with
local employers, we can help you to move forward!

A4TD is available at no cost to people who are 55 or older, reside in Delaware or Schoharie
County, unemployed with little or no income, and are in urgent need of a job. If you think you
might qualify, please call our local SCSEP office at 432-4800, extension 122. Or visit our website
at www.a4td.org.

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

United Way Offers Tax Filing Help

Tax filing season is right around the corner! Many people don’t realize that if you meet certain
income guidelines, you can file your taxes for free yourself or have them done for you, for free!
That means that ALL of your refund comes back to you, at no cost.

The United Way of Delaware and Otsego Counties, as lead agency in the Creating Assets
Savings and Hope (CASH) Coalition, and in partnership with the IRS and SUNY Oneonta, provide
free tax preparation and filing for anyone who made $54,000 or less in tax year 2017. We
operate a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) site at the First United Methodist Church at
66 Chestnut Street in Oneonta from January through April. This year’s hours will be Wednesday
evenings from 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
This site will begin appointments on January 27, 2018. Appointments for this service, although
not required, are highly recommended. You can call Catholic Charities at 607-432- 0061 to
schedule an appointment.

AARP will be doing free tax returns for seniors in Oneonta on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Fridays from 9am to 2pm and in Cooperstown on Thursdays from 9am-2pm. Call 547-4232
for an appointment.

Do you like to do your own taxes? United Way and H&R Block have partnered to offer anyone
who made $64,000 or less in 2017 a fast easy way to file your taxes at www.MyFreeTaxes.com.
CDO Workforce, at all of their locations, designates computers for the public to use on site to
file their taxes. Facilitators are available at SUNY-Delhi Sanford Hall room 148 from 10AM-2PM
on the following 7 Saturdays: 2/3-2/17 and 3/10-3/31. In addition, several public libraries in
Delaware and Otsego Counties also make computers available for use with the link to My Free
Taxes already loaded for easy access.

Don’t leave money on the table. File for free and utilize your full refund!

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Bright Kids Book Club Continues

Dear Kids and Parents!

      Bright Kids Book Club begins again on Saturday, January 11, at 1 pm. You will be meeting in Bright Hill's Kitchen Bookstore, and you will choose which book you want to read this fall (there are some very exciting new books from which to choose, and Linda Morgan will be there to read and discuss them with you).

We will also finish discussions on our last book, " Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library," a novel by Chris Grabenstein.

      The Book Club program is free and open to kids ages 8 - 14 and takes place from 1 - 2:00 pm 2nd and 4th Saturday (except during November and December, when it meets on only the 2nd Saturday, due to holidays); during each session, refreshments are served. Students who attend 2 out of 3 sessions are given a free copy of the book being read. In past years, Book Club kids have read up to 12 books in one year.

      It is very important that parents of students who want to read and discuss this book contact Bright Hill at wordthur@stny.rr.com or call 607-829-5055 so that we may order enough books for all.
      Bright Hill's 2016, 24th-year programs are made possible by grants from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; Otis  A. Thompson; A. Lindsay and Olive B. O'Connor; Dewar Foundations; Stewart's Shops; the Abraham Kellogg Education Fund; the Delaware Youth Bureau, through the auspices of the New York State Office of Children and Family Services; the Delaware National Bank of Delhi, Delaware County Office of Economic Development, and with the support of Bright Hill's members and friends.
       Bright Hill's facilities include the Bright Hill Community Library, home to more than 12,000 books and literary and art periodicals that may be borrowed by local residents; the complete catalog is online at http://bhc.scoolaid.net/bin/hom. The library is a member of the South Central Regional Library Council of New York. The organization and library, handicap-accessible, are located at 94 Church Street, Treadwell, NY 13846. Contact 607-829-5055 or wordthur@stny.rr.com for more information.   

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

SUNY Women's BB Falls to Poly

Cobleskill, N.Y.: The SUNY Cobleskill women’s basketball team returned to North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) action at the Iorio Gymnasium on Wednesdayevening by dropping a hard fought 62-56 decision to NEAC North Division leader SUNY Polytechnic Institute at the Iorio Gymnasium. With the defeat the Fighting Tigers fall to 7-6 overall on the season including a 2-3 mark in conference play while the Wildcats are now 7-5 overall with a 3-0 conference record.

Down 46-to-32 entering the fourth quarter the Fighting Tigers staged a spirited rally that cut the Wildcats lead down to 58-56 when sophomore guard Addy Lawson, Cooperstown, N.Y., Milford High School, stole an errant Wildcat pass and went the length of the court to score with only 26 seconds left to play.

However the home team could not complete the comeback as SUNY Poly connected on four late free throws and a pair of Fighting Tiger three-point attempts fell short to give the visitors the road victory.

Addy Lawson scored 16 points, grabbed seven rebounds and passed out four assists to key the Cobleskill comeback with sophomore guard Shaliyah Graham, Bronx, N.Y., Martin King Jr. High School, adding 16 points, nine rebounds and three steals. Sophomore center Stacey Sprague, Grand Gorge, N.Y., Roxbury High School, contributed eight points and 13 rebounds in the game while freshman forward Ali Changa, Watervliet, N.Y., Watervliet High School, added eight points and three rebounds on the evening.

The Fighting Tigers will next be in action over the weekend when they travel to Pennsylvania for a pair of NEAC contests starting on Saturday January 13th when they make their way to Chambersburg, Pa. to face the Phoenix of Wilson College for a 3:00 p.m. tip-off before heading to Bryn Athyn, Pa. for a conference meeting with the Lions of Bryn Athyn College beginning at 2:00 p.m.

FINAL BOX:


SUNY Poly vs SUNY Cobleskill
01/10/18 7:00 PM at Iorio Gymnasium, Cobleskill, N.Y.
Newspaper Box Score
SUNY Poly vs SUNY Cobleskill
01/10/18 7:00 PM at Iorio Gymnasium, Cobleskill, N.Y.
At Iorio Gymnasium, Cobleskill, N.Y.
SUNY POLY 62, SUNY COBLESKILL 56
SUNY POLY (7-5/3-0 NEAC)
Khristaijah Jackson 9-19 7-10 25; Kiersten Leos 2-13 5-6 10; Paige Gallo 2-8
3-3 7; Rylie Smith 2-3 1-3 6; Cassidy Albright 2-5 0-0 6; Shannon Harrison
2-4 0-0 4; Taylor Aybar 1-12 2-2 4; Courtney Cochran 0-0 0-0 0; Caitlyn
Mackay 0-0 0-0 0; Kayla Prosinski 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 20-65 18-24 62.
SUNY COBLESKILL (7-6/2-3 NEAC)
Addy Lawson 5-16 4-5 16; Shaliyah Graham 5-15 4-7 16; Stacey Sprague 3-6 2-5
8; Ali Changa 3-7 2-2 8; Alexia Massaroni 1-2 2-2 4; Yonique Hill 1-2 0-0 2;
Erica Cabrera 1-3 0-0 2; Monique Britton 0-0 0-0 0; Quincey Banks 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 19-51 14-21 56.
SUNY Poly.....................   25   12    9   16  -   62
SUNY Cobleskill...............    9   12   11   24  -   56
3-point goals--SUNY Poly 4-22 (Cassidy Albright 2-4; Kiersten Leos 1-7;
Rylie Smith 1-2; Taylor Aybar 0-4; Kayla Prosinski 0-1; Shannon Harrison
0-1; Paige Gallo 0-3), SUNY Cobleskill 4-17 (Addy Lawson 2-9; Shaliyah
Graham 2-7; Erica Cabrera 0-1). Fouled out--SUNY Poly-None, SUNY
Cobleskill-Erica Cabrera. Rebounds--SUNY Poly 36 (Khristaijah Jackson 9),
SUNY Cobleskill 49 (Stacey Sprague 13). Assists--SUNY Poly 11 (Paige Gallo
5), SUNY Cobleskill 8 (Addy Lawson 4). Total fouls--SUNY Poly 18, SUNY
Cobleskill 22. Technical fouls--SUNY Poly-None, SUNY Cobleskill-Erica
Cabrera. A-57

SUNY Men Basketball Loses to SUNY Poly

Cobleskill, N.Y.: The SUNY Cobleskill men’s basketball team stepped back into North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) action on Wednesday evening falling to the visiting Wildcats of SUNY Polytechnic Institute by a 60-52 score at the Iorio Gymnasium. With the loss the Fighting Tigers fall to 4-8 overall on the year including a 1-4 mark in conference play while the Wildcats are now 7-5 overall with a 3-0 conference record.

After trailing be as many as nine points in the second half the Fighting Tigers took a 52-48 lead with 3:33 remaining in regulation on a pair of free throws by senior swingman Joel Costello, Middleburgh, N.Y., Middleburgh High School/Onondaga Community College, as part of an 8-0 run which saw Costello account for six of the team’s points.

However down the stretch, the Orange & Black were outscored 12-0 by the Wildcats as Cobleskill 0-for-7 from the floor while SUNY Poly hit on an impressive 3-for-4 shots from the field and 5-of-6 attempts from the free throw line.

Joel Costello led the home team in scoring with 21 points to go with a team highs of six rebounds, five assists and five steals with freshman forward Antwan Claxton, Bronx, N.Y., Taft High School, chipping in 13 points and four rebounds on the evening.  

Cobleskill will return to action over the weekend when they travel to Pennsylvania over the weekend for a pair of NEAC contests starting on Saturday January 13thwhen they go to Chambersburg, Pa. to face the Phoenix of Wilson College with tip-off at 1:00 p.m. before making the trip to Bryn Athyn, Pa. for a conference meeting with the Lions of Bryn Athyn College beginning at 12:00 p.m.

FINAL BOX:

SUNY Poly vs SUNY Cobleskill
01/10/18 5:00 PM at Iorio Gymnasium, Cobleskill, N.Y.
Newspaper Box Score
SUNY Poly vs SUNY Cobleskill
01/10/18 5:00 PM at Iorio Gymnasium, Cobleskill, N.Y.
At Iorio Gymnasium, Cobleskill, N.Y.
SUNY POLY 60, SUNY COBLESKILL 52
SUNY POLY (7-5/3-0 NEAC)
Kevin Williams 10-15 1-2 21; Redell Freeman 8-18 2-2 20; Blake Haga 2-7 4-4
10; Malik Johnson 2-4 1-1 5; Josh Rodriguez 1-2 2-2 4; Tyler Taverne 0-4 0-4
0; Frank Reali 0-5 0-0 0; Danny Reidell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 23-56 10-15 60.
SUNY COBLESKILL (4-8/1-4 NEAC)
Joel Costello 9-18 3-7 21; Antwan Claxton 5-7 3-4 13; Malik Chambers 3-10
0-0 6; Devin Boyle 2-5 0-0 5; Ja'Quan McGill 2-6 0-0 5; Christian Cooper 1-1
0-0 2; Nathaniel Nickel 0-0 0-0 0; Islam Mustafa 0-0 0-0 0; Kahlil Wilson
0-0 0-0 0; Anthony McNeil 0-2 0-2 0. Totals 22-49 6-13 52.
SUNY Poly.....................   27   33  -   60
SUNY Cobleskill...............   23   29  -   52
3-point goals--SUNY Poly 4-18 (Redell Freeman 2-6; Blake Haga 2-7; Frank
Reali 0-4; Danny Reidell 0-1), SUNY Cobleskill 2-17 (Devin Boyle 1-4;
Ja'Quan McGill 1-5; Malik Chambers 0-4; Antwan Claxton 0-1; Joel Costello
0-3). Fouled out--SUNY Poly-Kevin Williams, SUNY Cobleskill-Christian
Cooper. Rebounds--SUNY Poly 38 (Kevin Williams 11), SUNY Cobleskill 28 (Joel
Costello 6). Assists--SUNY Poly 14 (Malik Johnson 8), SUNY Cobleskill 8
(Joel Costello 5). Total fouls--SUNY Poly 16, SUNY Cobleskill 17. Technical
fouls--SUNY Poly-None, SUNY Cobleskill-TEAM. A-77


Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options

SUNY Men Downed by Wilsom

Chambersburg, Pa.: The road proved to be a rocky one for the SUNY Cobleskill men’s basketball team on Saturday afternoon as the Fighting Tigers dropped a hard fought 89-81 decision to the host Phoenix of Wilson College in North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) action. With the loss the Fighting Tigers fall to 4-9 overall on the season with a 1-5 record in NEAC action while the Phoenix improve to 9-5 overall on the year with a 3-2 mark in league play.

In a game that featured 13 ties and 12 lead changes, Cobleskill tied the contest at 76-76 with 5:25 remaining in regulation when junior forward Anthony McNeil, Binghamton, N.Y., Binghamton High School/Broome Community College, scored from short range.
However the home team responded by going on a 6-0 run to make it 82-76 with 3:36 left to play from which they never looked back as the Fighting Tigers committed four turnovers and shot only 1-for-4 from the field down the stretch. .

Senior swingman Joel Costello, Middleburgh, N.Y., Middleburgh High School/Tompkins-Cortland Community College, led in scoring Cobleskill with 26 points to go with three assists with Anthony McNeil coming off the bench to score a season high of 23 points while grabbing a team high eight rebounds on the afternoon.

The Fighting Tigers will next travel to Bryn Athyn, Pa. on Sunday to conclude their weekend road trip with a NEAC game versus the Lions of Bryn Athyn College with tip-off at 1:00 p.m. 

FINAL BOX:

SUNY Cobleskill vs Wilson College
01/13/18 1:00pm at Chambersburg, Pa.
Newspaper Box Score
Cobleskill vs Wilson
01/13/18 1:00pm at Chambersburg, Pa.
At Chambersburg, Pa.
WILSON 89, COBLESKILL 81
COBLESKILL (4-9, 1-5 NEAC)
Joel Costello 9-16 4-7 26; Anthony McNeil 9-12 5-6 23; Malik Chambers 5-15
0-0 10; Devin Boyle 2-6 0-0 6; Christian Cooper 3-7 0-0 6; Nathaniel Nickel
1-3 2-2 4; Kahlil Wilson 1-1 0-0 2; Antwan Claxton 1-5 0-1 2; Ja'Quan McGill
0-3 2-2 2. Totals 31-68 13-18 81.
WILSON (9-5, 3-2 NEAC)
Zachary Powell 7-12 9-10 27; Rashaan Bean 7-16 1-2 17; Keion Adams 5-9 2-2
14; Willie McDowell 5-9 3-4 14; Cole Christian 2-5 1-2 6; Ian Frazier 1-8
2-2 4; Martez Beckett 1-3 0-0 3; Ian Hess 1-2 0-0 3; Marquise Beckett 0-1
1-2 1; Montaz McCray 0-0 0-0 0; Jeremiah Delaney 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-65
19-24 89.
Cobleskill....................   40   41  -   81
Wilson........................   42   47  -   89
3-point goals--Cobleskill 6-24 (Joel Costello 4-6; Devin Boyle 2-6; Malik
Chambers 0-5; Christian Cooper 0-1; Nathaniel Nickel 0-2; Antwan Claxton
0-1; Ja'Quan McGill 0-3), Wilson 12-30 (Zachary Powell 4-7; Keion Adams 2-6;
Rashaan Bean 2-5; Willie McDowell 1-2; Cole Christian 1-4; Ian Hess 1-2;
Martez Beckett 1-2; Ian Frazier 0-2). Fouled out--Cobleskill-Antwan Claxton,
Wilson-None. Rebounds--Cobleskill 34 (Anthony McNeil 8), Wilson 46 (Keion
Adams 12). Assists--Cobleskill 9 (Joel Costello 3), Wilson 17 (Willie
McDowell 4). Total fouls--Cobleskill 19, Wilson 16. Technical
fouls--Cobleskill-None, Wilson-None. A-110


Attachments area

Remember to Subscribe!

Subscription Options
Hurt in an accident? Search Ehline Law Firm Personal Injury Attorneys, APLC for great info on getting money.

Subscribe!

Subscription Options

Follow by Email

Site Archive

Submit your information below or email us at theschoharienews@gmail.com

Name

Email *

Message *