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Iroquious Museum Hosting New Events

Written By Editor on 6/15/21 | 6/15/21

Howes Cave cultural museum to present social dancers, artist demos, workshop, concert, and festival in July, August, and September

HOWES CAVE --The Iroquois Museum announces a slate of events for the summer, including weekend Iroquois social dancers and artist demonstrations, a workshop, a community concert, and its annual Iroquois Arts Festival.


Every Saturday and select Sundays in July and August, the Museum will present its Echoes of Tradition series, which brings dancers and artists from across Iroquois Country to the Schoharie County museum to share aspects of the culture with visitors. 


Different Iroquois (also known as Haudenosaunee) social dance troupes will perform on July 3 and 10 and Aug. 14 throughout opening hours. Artists demonstrating skills such as beadwork, fingerweaving, porcupine quillwork, moccasins, and drums will be at the Museum on July 17, 24, 25, and 31; and Aug. 1, 7, and 21. A full schedule for Echoes of Tradition is below. 


The Museum will present a fundraiser, Roots, Rhythm, & Ale on Friday, Aug. 6, from 5 to 9 p.m. The community event includes live music by popular Zydeco group The Rubber Band and Iroquois singer-songwriter Mike Jones, local artisans, and food and beverages from local vendors. Tickets are $20 and include a commemorative cup and free beer from Serious Brewing. Concert-only tickets are $10. Proceeds support Museum education programs and collection management. 


The annual Iroquois Arts Festival over Labor Day Weekend is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 4, and Sunday, Sept. 5, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. The festival celebrates Haudenosaunee creativity with live performances by cultural groups, demonstrations, an outdoor Arts Market with traditional and contemporary arts and fine crafts, family activities, and more. The event will feature The Sky Dancers from Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Onondaga storyteller Perry Ground, the Museum’s archaeology department, and wildlife rehabilitator Kelly Martin, who will bring a variety of animals, including birds of prey.  

The Iroquois Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday from May until October. Admission is $5-$8, and children 5 and younger are free. For more information about the Museum and upcoming events, visit www.iroquoismuseum.org


ABOUT THE IROQUOIS INDIAN MUSEUM


The Iroquois Indian Museum is an independent nonprofit cultural museum founded in Schoharie County, NY in 1981. It houses the largest collection of contemporary Iroquois art in the world and offers a window into Iroquois culture and history through archaeology, visual arts, and performing arts. The 7,300 square-foot facility inspired by the traditional Iroquois longhouse presents changing and permanent exhibits, the Children’s Museum, and the Museum Shop, which features hand-crafted Iroquois art, silver, and leatherwork. The museum is surrounded by a 45-acre Nature Park, two 19th-century log houses formerly on the Six Nations Reserve, and a 500-seat outdoor covered amphitheater. 


The Iroquois Indian Museum is a cultural museum that houses the largest collection of contemporary Iroquois art in the world and offers a window into Iroquois culture and history through archaeology, visual arts, and performing arts. The Museum also has a 45-acre Nature Park and permanent and annual special art exhibits.



2021 Schedule of Events

We are thrilled to be able to present events this year after not being open since 2019. Most events will be presented outside with public health safety precautions in place. All events are free with the cost of Museum admission* (The Fingerweaving Workshop on Sunday, July 25, requires a fee for materials and reservation.) We look forward to seeing you this year! For more information, email us at info@iroquoismuseum.org or visit www.iroquoismuseum.org


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Saturday, July 3

Haudenosaunee Dancers from Onondaga

Performances at 11 am and 2 pm, depending on audience size

Price: Museum admission

Pride in the culture, discipline, and a dedication to tradition are a hallmark of the Haudeno saunee Dancers, who perform Iroquois social dances as practiced in their small traditional community near Syracuse. Leader and skilled seamstress Sherri Waterman-Hopper has traveled internationally as an artist and cultural speaker, and she will be joined by a core group of singers, musicians, and dancers. They will perform at various times throughout the day.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Saturday, July 10

Onyota’a:ka Dancers from Oneida

Performances at 11 am and 2 pm, depending on audience size

Price: Museum admission

Haudenosaunee dance group Onyota’a:ka Dancers from Oneida will offer presentations at the Museum throughout the day. Onota’a:ka was founded by Elder and Wolf Clan Mother Maisie Shenandoah for the purpose of cultural education, which has been carried on by Maisie’s daughter Vicki. Onota’a:ka includes individuals from the Mohawk and Lenape nations as well as Oneida. This blended tribal composition is somewhat unusual, but demonstrates one of the mission of the group to raise awareness of the diversity of Native traditions.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Saturday, July 17

Artists Demo by Teoi Elijah, Traditional Outfits

Various times from 10 am to 5 pm

Price: Museum admission

Teio is Akwesasne Mohawk and the owner of Shaking Reeds Designs, which specializes in custom-made Iroquois clothing and accessories for men, women, and children such as intricately beaded collars and cuffs, beaded and appliqu├ęd ribbon shirts and skirts, breechcloths, and leggings. She will offer demonstrations throughout the day.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Saturday, July 24

Artist Demo by Marilyn Hill, Fingerweaving

Various times from 10 am to 5 pm

Price: Museum admission

Marilyn is Tuscarora Bear Clan and self-taught in the old-style loomless weaving technique popular in the 18th Century for sashes and garters. While most men today purchase commercially produced sashes, Marilyn has spearheaded a small revival. She will offer demonstrations throughout the day.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Sunday, July 25

Fingerweaving Workshop with Marilyn Hill

10 am

Price: $40 ($35 Museum Members)

Fingerweaving artist Marilynn Hill, Tuscarora, will lead a workshop on the skill popular in the 18th century. Registration and attendance fee is required.

Tix: http://www.eventbrite.com/.../fingerweaving-workshop-with...


Saturday-Sunday, July 31-August 1

Artist Demo by Jamie Jacobs Porcupine Quillwork

Various times during opening hours

Price: Museum admission

Jamie is a cultural educator and artist from the Seneca community of Tonawanda and admired for his attention to detail and historic knowledge. He will offer demonstrations throughout the weekend on porcupine quillwork, which is used in decorative elements on Haudenosaunee objects, such as clothing, moccasins, and quiver pouches. Jamie is a collections assistant at the Rochester Museum and Science Center.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Saturday, August 7

Artist Demo by Anna Thompson, Moccasins and Beadwork

Various times from 10 am to 5 pm

Price: Museum admission

Anna is from the Mohawk community of Akwesasne and admired for her workmanship and use of hand-tanned leather, color, and original beaded designs on moccasins, dance garters, mittens, and other items. She has been honored by the Ganondagan State Historic Site, the Abenaki and Mohawk Art Market at the Adirondack Experience, and others. She will offer demonstrations of her skill throughout the day.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Saturday, August 14

Allegany River Dancers

Performances at 11 am and 2 pm, depending on audience size

Price: Museum admission

Founded in 1979, the Allegany River Dancers have become one of the best-known Native dance groups in North America. Their performances often encourage audience participation and feature intertribal “Pow wow” style dances, such as a dance that uses 30 hoops to form designs found in nature.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...


Saturday, August 21

Artist Demo by Randy Greene, Drums and Rattles

Various times from 10 am to 5 pm

Price: Museum admission

Randy is Tuscarora Nation Turtle Clan and leads a social dance troupe. He will demonstrate the construction of the traditional arts of waterdrum, cow horn rattle, and feather fan used in social dances.

Advance Tix: https://www.eventbrite.com/.../echoes-of-tradition...

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