Recent Articles

From around the County:

Delhi Woman Dies After Head on Collision with Truck

Written By Editor on 5/19/17 | 5/19/17


On Thursday morning Delaware County Sheriff's Deputies, New York State Police and the Delhi Fire Department and Emergency Squad responded a fatal, two vehicle head on collision on State Highway 10 in the Town of Delhi that claimed the life of a Delhi resident.



Investigation by Sheriff's Deputies and members New York State Police Troop "C" Collision Reconstruction Unit and their Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Unit revealed that at approximately 9:30 a.m Thursday. 77 year old Carol S. Lowell, of Delhi, was traveling north on State Highway 10 when her vehicle crossed the center line of the highway and collided head-on with a southbound dump truck, driven by 62 year old Paul T. Jurjens of Walton, which subsequently overturned in southbound ditch.  Jurjens was able to extricate himself from the dump truck moments before it became engulfed in fire.



Lowell was pronounced dead at the scene as a result of injuries she sustained in the impact.  Jurjens was transported to O'Connor Hospital by members of the Delhi Emergency Squad and was later released.

As a result of the collision, State Highway 10 was shut down until approximately 3:00pm Thursday afternoon while Deputies and State Police Collision Reconstruction experts investigated the accident and crews were able to clear the wreckage from the roadway.

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Oneonta Professor Seeks Otsego District Seat

Written By Editor on 5/17/17 | 5/17/17

Catherine Nardi, an Otego resident, is a communications and media studies professor at SUNY Oneonta. As a single mother raising a child in District No. 3, she has a unique knowledge of the wonderful opportunities and the formidable obstacles her friends and neighbors attempt to balance. Catherine Nardi appreciates the beautiful - and in some places pristine - natural environment that offers clean water and fresh air - and hundreds of ways to enjoy leisure time.
However, for many in hard financial times it is difficult to make ends meet. Many people work two jobs and still have to choose between food and medicine. Mothers and fathers go hungry so they can buy their kids a warm winter coat. It is no wonder so many people have turned to heroin to forget their hardships.
“I believe that most people are mostly good,” Catherine Nardi said. “Give them access to basic necessities and good people become better.”

Catherine Nardi believes that communities should work together to ensure that all families are fed, have heat in the winter and have access to health care and education.
“People should be free to pursue happiness instead of being tied and bound to the endless cycle of poverty. People who have their basic needs met – food * clothing * shelter * heat * and medicine - they are creative, happy, and productive.
“Healthy families anchor healthy community, and healthy community are productive communities.”
Catherine Nardi said she has a moderate, Jeffersonian view of policy making.
“We came to this country to free ourselves from tyranny,” Catherine Nardi said. “Freedom, on the scale we enjoy it, is very American. We should be free to make a family with a partner who loves us, we should be free to say what we think, and we should be free to discover things about science, religion, art and society we never knew. But with great freedom come great responsibility and we must take responsibility for our great resources and protect them from greed. We must make sure that every one of us, from the greatest to the least of us, has the opportunity to prosper from this great nation.
“America has always been great.”
As a community, Laurens and Otego are facing several difficulties and many possibilities.
“Together we are Laurens and Otego and the possibilities are endless.”

West Kortright Center Welcomes First Gallery Exhibit of Season

(EAST MEREDITH) The West Kortright Centre is pleased to present its first gallery exhibit of the 2017 season—a group painting and collage show featuring work by Christine Alexander, Lanny Harrison, and Lenny Failla. There will be an opening reception on Friday, May 26th from 5-7PM. This event is free and open to the public, with food and drink generously provided by caterer Rod Sauquillo and Brewery Ommegang. The exhibit runs through July 7th, viewable during West Kortright Centre events or by appointment.
Christine Alexander’s life-long fascination with color is reflected in her work. This East Meredith-based artist paints in watercolor and acrylic and makes intricate cut-paper collages. Often whimsical, her paintings are characteristically brightly hued. She teaches art and collage workshops and has shown her art in many solo and group exhibitions.

Lanny Harrison–performer, visual artist, teacher, poet–has been making collages, paintings, cutouts, and costumes for most of her life. Harrison is a founding teacher of The West Kortright Centre’s theater workshops, including Introduction to Acting & East Meets West. She also teaches at NYU’s Gallatin School & at Shambhala Meditation Center of NY and is currently working on a mixed-media theater show, ‘Another Nomadic Event’, in collaboration with Steve Clorfeine, Robin Daniels, Christine Alicino, and Wendell Beavers.

Lenny Failla has been actively painting houses for over twenty years, often using cardboard to cover floors and work areas. Failla, a former art teacher, uses the stained and dripped-upon cardboard as a stage for artistic play, adding deliberate strokes, splashes, and found objects.

The West Kortright Centre is located midway between Oneonta, Delhi, and Stamford. Follow signs from state Route 23 in Davenport Center or state Route 10 east of Delhi. For exact travel directions, visit www.westkc.org.

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SEVA Workshop Gluten Free, Whole Food Cooking and Baking

Workshop: Gluten Free, Whole Food Cooking and Baking
Date:  Saturday June 3th
Time: 1:30-4:00
Fee: $20 (covers recipes, tips, research, and food samples)
Registration: contact Renee’ at 607-326-4169 or SEVA at (607) 538-1130.
Whether you are a vegetarian, interested in health benefits, weight loss, environmental concerns, want to expand your repertoire or reduce your budget, this workshop is for you. We will provide a how-to guide to cooking, baking, and tasting, and you will leave with tips and receive recipes.

Explore the benefits of baking with almond flour, You'll learn how to incorporate beans and grains into your family’s diet. Learn how to make easy soups, loaves, burgers, breadcrumb substitutes Discover how easy it is to make tortillas. Baking treats include easy almond-flour recipes like hearty breakfast squares and chocolate cake. Learn how to make easy no-flour four-ingredient muffins and chocolate almond-butter brownies.

Renee’ Barchitta, MPA, is an organic vegetable gardener in the Catskill Mountains, a vegetarian and gluten-free cook and baker, and a former whole-foods baker selling to local establishments. Renee’ is an educator, a member of Plant Pioneers, the Human-Plant Relations Movement, and an Associate for ASEA Redox Supplement a Biotech Company Advancing Life.                                                                                    

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Cobleskill Police Blotter

Cobleskill Police Department
Press Release

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

At 1:51 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Jesse L. Largesse, 26, of Esperance, NY, for DWI.  He was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 23rd at 5:00 p.m.

At 2:45 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Joseph G. Conneely, 76, of Middleburgh, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued a Criminal Summons and released.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 23rd at 5:00 p.m.

Friday, May 12, 2017

At 7:50 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Christopher R. McHargue, 26, of Cobleskill, NY, on an Arrest Warrant for Disseminating Indecent Material to a Minor and Endangering the Welfare of a Child. He was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and remanded to the Schoharie County Jail on $1250 Bail / $2500 Bond. He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, May13, 2017

At 2:10 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Michael H. Klein, 25, of Cobleskill, NY, for Disorderly Conduct.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on June 6th at 5:00 p.m.

At 12:15 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Steven Rundblad, Jr., 32, of East Worcester, NY, on a Warrant for 2 counts of Petit Larceny.  He was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and released.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

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Spring on Main Festival Planned May 20 in Margaretville

Written By Editor on 5/16/17 | 5/16/17

Margaretville — The village will be hopping on Saturday, May 20 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. when the Business Association of Margaretville (BAM)  holds its annual Spring on Main Festival.

Margaretville businesses will be hosting many special events as part of the celebration. A portion of Main Street will be closed to traffic as visiting vendors and many shop owners set up along the outdoors to create a festive atmosphere.

The day’s activities will include live entertainment by Bowery Creek, a chicken BBQ by the Margaretville Fire Department with proceeds donated to BAM, local arts and crafts and entertainment geared toward all ages.

The event will also serve as a welcome to the community’s newest businesses, Catskill Mountain Tattoo in the Binnekill Square complex, Catskills Seasons Ltd. at 768 Main Street and The Happy Giraffe in the Granary building on Bridge Street.

The event will also include a book signing at Home Goods of Margaretville with Tia Keenan author of The Art of the Cheese Plate; Catskill Candies and Confections will offer tastings of fudge, chocolate and birch syrup; the Margaretville Liquor Store will host a wine tasting and the Cheese Barrel will host a tasting of local cheeses with products from Two Stone Farm.

Picnic! will host a cookie decorating event, Foothills Shoe will have booth with specially priced goods and the Hospital Auxiliary Thrift Shop will hold a one-day sale and many village businesses will be offering in-store sales, too.

For additional information, please visit: mainstreetmargaretville.com or call 845 586-4177.

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SUNY Cobleskill to Host Excelsior Scholarship Information Session on Thursday, May 4

Written By Editor on 5/2/17 | 5/2/17

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has announced that members of his administration and SUNY leaders will kick off a tour of SUNY campuses to hold information sessions about the first-in-the nation program to provide tuition-free college at New York’s public colleges and universities to families making up to $125,000 a year, the Excelsior Scholarship. The events will be open to the public. Students, parents and faculty are all encouraged to attend to learn how they can benefit from the scholarship.

Under the Excelsior Scholarship, nearly 80 percent, or 940,000 middle-class families and individuals making up to $125,000 per year, would qualify to attend college tuition-free at all CUNY and SUNY two-year and four-year colleges in New York State.

WHAT: Guillermo Linares, Acting President, NYS Higher Education Services Corporation, to Host Excelsior Scholarship Information Session at SUNY Cobbleskill

WHEN: Thursday, May 4, 12:30 PM

WHERE: SUNY Cobleskill
Upper Champlin Dining Hall
106 Suffolk Circle
Cobleskill, NY

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Mothers Day Weekend Brunch Buffet and Farm Tour at the Café at Heather Ridge

Written By Editor on 5/1/17 | 5/1/17



Preston Hollow – Celebrate Mother’s Day weekend, Saturday and Sunday, May 13 and 14, with a tasty brunch buffet right on the farm, and a tour to see the farm’s mothers and babies. There will be goat kids, piglets and chicks to see, and may be the first of the season lambs, too!

The brunch buffet will be featured from 11am to 3pm. Heather Ridge Benedict is a poached egg and cured pork loin on a farm made English muffin, topped with ramp hollandaise. Other items include Corned Beef Hash, Spring Rice Pilaf, Marinated Asparagus Salad, Smoked Chicken Cornbread, Eggs any style made to order and French Chocolate Pots de Creme.  Freshly roasted organic fair trade coffee is available as well as teas and juice.  The cost of the buffet is $24 adult and kids pay their age.

A farm tour starts at 11am, free to café guests.  Guests will see the momma goats and their kids, as well as baby chicks and piglets.  The grownup llamas, alpacas, geese, laying hens and guinea hens can be seen, too.  And a flock of very pregnant sheep!

The Cafe and farm store is open from 11am-3pm. The farm store offers Heather Ridge Farm’s Animal Welfare Approved grassfed meats, pastured poultry, artisan sausages and regional dairy products and cheeses.

Rob Handel is the chef at Heather Ridge Farm and the Bees Knees Café bringing an innovative approach to the “farm and forage to table” menu, with monthly “Supper Club” events, on and off farm catering, and cooking classes. The wildly popular “Supper Club” is a five-course dinner featuring the meat and poultry of Heather Ridge Farm paired with the best of local produce. The next dates are Saturday, May 20 at 6pm and Saturday, June 10, at 7pm.  Advance reservations are required.

The Bees Knees Café at Heather Ridge Farm is located at 989 Broome Center Road, Preston Hollow, NY.  518-239-6234. The café is open year-round, and will have an expanded summer schedule. Just drop in! Weekly menus and a calendar of events are updated weekly on its website at www.heather-ridge-farm.com

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Cobleskill Police Blotter

Thursday, April 27, 2017

At 10:22 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Peter Hofman, 49, of Cobleskill, NY, for Unlawful Possession of Marihuana.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

At 10:22 p.m.  Cobleskill Police arrested Nathan A. Merchant, 30, of Cobleskill, NY, for Unlawful Possession of Marihuana.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

Friday, April 28, 2017

At 8:05 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Jacob Danielson, 34, of Richmondville, NY, for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation of a Motor Vehicle 3rd.  He was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 23rd at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Elizabeth M. VanBuren, 20, of Kerhonkson, NY, for Open Container.  She was issued a summons for Possession of Alcohol by a person under the age of 21.  She was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 18th at 4:00 p.m.

At 6:14 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Louis Matthew Bellina, 19, of Merrick, NY, for Disorderly Conduct.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 23rd at 5:00 p.m.

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Seward Woman Arrested for Oxycodone

On Thursday April 27th the Schoharie Sheriff's Office arrested Michelle L. Brown age 34 of the Town of Seward for Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance 7th degree and Introducing Contraband into a Prison 2nd degree.

Subject was being committed to the custody of the Sheriff's Office when Corrections Officer found that she had in her possession Oxycodone and Tramadol.

Subject was issued an appearance ticket to appear in Schoharie Village on May 8th. She was then was committed to the Albany County Correctional Facility on the order of County Drug Court from a previous incident


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A Fond Farewell

Written By Tyler James on 4/27/17 | 4/27/17

Matthew Avitabile approached me in late July 2016 about helping him bring The Schoharie News to print. My grammatically incorrect reply? "Eh."

That is the 100% true, albeit short, story about the beginnings of the current version of The Mountain Eagle. I had heard the reports, about how newspapers were a dying business. My initial reaction was one of skepticism. How could it not be? We might as well open a video store. (If you recently opened a video store, ignore the sarcasm. I'm sure it will be an incredible success.)

I couldn't have been more wrong.

The reason I was wrong is two fold. The first is fairly obvious and straightforward. People can't get local news online. So nationally, smaller papers are doing quite well. The second is the kind of paper we decided to publish. We would focus on the community, sourcing our material directly from the community we serve. If you read TME, you notice the myriad of columnists and contributors we have. We felt that a paper for the people, by the people (yes, I'm aware of the similarity) would be the most effective method of attracting interest.

The results have been astounding. Feedback has shown us that we were on the right track, and that people want a choice. I have been involved in every aspect of this business since the beginning, and I'm proud to say that we have accomplished what we set out to do.

That being said, I will be leaving the newspaper at the end of the week to pursue opportunities elsewhere. My experience working on the paper and for other ventures in this area have been nothing short of amazing, and I want to thank every one of you for welcoming me here with open arms. I will forever be appreciative.

Now, a word about my friend, business partner, and mentee Mathew Avitabile. I've seen the tireless work he puts into this publication first hand. The late nights, early mornings and long days. The point is, he truly cares about making this thing we built a success. Matt wants to be a truthful voice in this region, and stops at nothing to please everyone he encounters. A truly great guy, and I'll miss him.

I won't name everyone, because that would take up way too much space and be tedious at best. Tim Knight, Cathleen Berry, Steve Kowalski, Darlene Patterson, Bill Kinisky, the Mortons, Scott Bennet Jr. and Frank Kovacofsky.

Thank you.


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Why Promotional Products Work

Written By Editor on 4/26/17 | 4/26/17

(Hint: They’re More Than Just Products)

If you, like millions of others, watched this year’s Super Bowl for more than the game, you know the power of advertising backed by money and research; companies pitch brands and slogans that attempt to leave a lasting effect on the consumer. Many like to believe those messages don’t have much impact, but evidence overwhelmingly points to the power of persuasion.

It may be subtle, but persuasion by advertisers shows levels of success that prove television, radio, mobile and digital can—and do—draw consumers to their brands. They must compete not only with each other across traditional and digital media for the hearts, minds and dollars of the consumer, but they must compete with outside stimuli once the consumer walks away from the television, shuts down the computer or drives past a billboard.

What does leave a lasting impression is the promotional product. A $20+ billion industry, promotional products are designed for staying power, and industry research has proven their power as an effective advertising medium.

A PPAI study conducted among travelers at New York’s La Guardia Airport revealed new insights into promotional products’ value and effectiveness. Of the travelers surveyed who could recall receiving a promotional product in the previous 12 months, 88 percent could recall the name of the advertiser and 85 percent have done business with an advertiser as a result of receiving an item.

Imagine being able to craft a message one time, and see that message spread to an audience of hundreds, thousands and even millions. Now imagine that message being delivered by a t-shirt, a pen or a beverage cup. Promotional products professionals work with Fortune 500 companies and top ad agencies to create experiences people love through a product they can actually use.

The same study by PPAI reports that 82 percent of respondents possess at least one and as many as 10 promotional items, with 81 percent keeping them because they are useful. What’s more, 53 percent said they use these products at least once a week and even more—47 percent—said they keep promotional products for more than a year.

Powerhouse advertisers aren’t the only ones who earn a mighty piece of the advertising pie; from mom-and pop to mid-sized companies, promotional products professionals apply research-based technical expertise to deliver the hottest products and production techniques to their clients’ campaigns, improving their reach and boosting their bottom lines as well.

What comes to mind when you think of the color PINK? How about a red lapel ribbon? Or a yellow wristband? Promotional products work because they leave a lasting impression in the hearts, minds and hands of recipients. The messages live on because the products are memorable, unique and personal. They are the only sensory medium that gives the consumer a tangible memory of a relationship to the brand. Promotional products are shown to build communities of like-minded consumers with a shared sense of
brand loyalty.

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The History Behind Why Cobleskill’s Vote is Worth Fifteen Times More Than Blenheim’s

The idea of “one man, one vote” is a treasured concept in modern democracies, as it represents the individual power and responsibility of a citizen.

This concept has no place on the Schoharie County Board of Supervisors, however.

Based off of a demographically configured weighted vote system, the county’s 16 Town Supervisors are each assigned a number of votes that corresponds to the population of their municipality as a percentage of the county’s population as a whole.

For example: while incumbent Cobleskill Supervisor Leo McAllister casts 481 weighted votes as a result of his town’s high population, current Blenheim Supervisor Shawn Smith casts only 33 weighted votes due to his municipality’s sparse population.

This means that even though both men are their township’s highest elected representative on the county board, Mr. McAllister’s vote on any issue carries nearly fifteen times the weight of that of Mr. Smith’s.

With the county board’s 2,974 available weighted votes being divided between the 16 town supervisors based on population, it is mathematically possible for a two-thirds majority of the board to oppose a motion and still have fewer weighted votes than the supervisors representing the five largest towns in the county.

So long as the supervisors of Cobleskill, Middleburgh, Schoharie, Richmondville and Esperance pool their 1,604 weighted votes together on any issue, they have more than the 1,488 vote threshold necessary to approve or disapprove of any motion being considered.

Although this pooling of votes has not always occurred, due to divisions by faction or party, all five towns are currently represented by Republican supervisors who more often than not work together as a whole.

However, it was not always this way, as the county board use to operate under a one town, one vote system until the United States Supreme Court ruled in Reynolds V. Sims that legislative districts could not be based on land area (such as towns in a county, or counties in a state), because densely populated districts were being disenfranchised to the benefit of sparsely populated districts.

When asked for historical context on this issue, Conesville Supervisor Bill Federice told The Mountain Eagle that, “After the courts ruled the one town equals one vote system of county legislative government was unconstitutional the county was faced with the decision of whether to scrap the Board of Supervisors as it was then constructed and set up a legislative body based on equal districts which crossed town lines.”
 
“As a result, the option of creating a county legislative body with districts based on equal population was put to county voters several decades ago and soundly defeated,” continued Federice.

The supervisor added that, “It would appear the voters back in the day preferred the weighted vote to not having a guarantee someone from their town would be their elected representative at the county.”

Which is where the situation stands now more than five decades after the Supreme Court’s initial ruling on the issue resulted in Schoharie County’s weighted vote system that it has today.

Schoharie County Historical Society Spring Meeting at Lansing Manor

Written By Editor on 4/25/17 | 4/25/17


The annual Spring Program Meeting of the Schoharie County Historical Society will be held on Thursday, April 27, at 7 PM at the New York Power Authority’s Visitors Center in North Blenheim.  The public is invited to attend the meeting and visit the Lansing Manor House afterward.
A new operating agreement for the Manor between the Power Authority and the Historical Society was signed earlier this year.  Historical Society Director Carle Kopecky will introduce the Society’s new Director of Educational Outreach Melinda McTaggart, who will now manage the Lansing Manor operations among other duties.  The new agreement means an enhanced role at Lansing Manor, in southern Schoharie County, and with schools in the region.
“Methods of interpreting historic house museums have changed dramatically in the past 20 years” says Mr. Kopecky. “We look forward to exploring ways these new techniques might be introduced at Lansing Manor.” Referring to the popular PBS TV series he adds, “I like to think of it as the Downton Abbey of Schoharie County and we should be presenting it that way!”
Lansing Manor has been restored as needed and maintained by the Power Authority since the 1970s, with the Manor staffed by the Historical Society. "The addition of a new Director of Educational Outreach position is an opportunity for us (NYPA) to work more closely with the society to further interpret this fine piece of local history", said Mario Roefaro Community Relations Manager for NYPA. “We look forward to continuing to promote all that the Schoharie County Historical Society and NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center have to offer to residents and visitors alike.”
Schoharie County Historical Society is in its 128th year at the Old Stone Fort Museum Complex in Schoharie, publishing the semi-annual “Historical Review” of county history, and organizing lectures and historical events such as Stone Fort Days, History Fair and the upcoming Schoharie Street Movies Centennial on June 8 and 10.  More information about the Society, membership and volunteer opportunities, can be found on our website, theoldstonefort.org.
To learn more about visiting NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center and the Lansing Manor Complex please visit http://www.nypa.gov/BGVisitorsCenter.

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The Role of Bad Faith Insurance

Written By Editor on 4/24/17 | 4/24/17

By Michael Ehline

When a driver crashes their car or slips at work, they expect their insurance company to come to their aid. Often insurance policies are expensive and cumbersome. The big insurance companies assure the policyholders of the ironclad nature of their contracts. However, when push comes to shove many are left out in the cold.

Bad faith insurance is a recurring problem for large and small insurance companies alike. However, the larger insurance conglomerates often have the legal resources to fight against their own policyholders. Many states have statutes against bad faith insurance, but they are often hard to prove. Furthermore, the recourse of fighting the big companies as the little guys is difficult. In fact, this is so difficult that many consumers simply give up.

However, accident victims should never give up without a fight. There are plenty of legal recourses available for them. Attorneys that fight for them on commission offer one option. This allows clients to get their time’s worth and only pay if they win the case. It also allows the attorney flexibility in taking on the big insurance company.

Each of these provide different ammunition for the consumer. Their policies often have lofty maximum values and promises the companies simply won’t keep. Understanding the fundamental issues in and around the insurance companies is one major step in the right direction. Having the right lawyer to fight on their behalf is yet another. Research consumer complaints against each insurance carrier before you choose one. You’ll be happy that you took the extra time. No policy is perfect, but the peace of mind knowing you’re truly protected is something that money can actually buy.


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Cobleskill Police Blotter

Monday, April 17, 2017

At 10:20 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Brian J. Lindstadt, 42, of Sharon Springs, NY, for DWI and other vehicle and traffic tickets.  He was released and is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

Thursday April 20, 2017

At 5:57 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Rebecca Sawyer, 31, of Richmondville, NY, for Aggravated Unlicensed Operation 2nd and Suspended Registration.  She was arraigned in Cobleskill Town Court and remanded to the Schoharie County Jail on $250 Bail / $500 Bond.  She is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on April 25th at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

At 1:00 p.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Rachel Raiti, 23, of East Berne, NY, for Petit Larceny.  She was issued on an appearance ticket and released.  She is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 16th at 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

At 12:10 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested John D. Miller, Jr., 37, of Cobleskill, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 12:10 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Bambie L. Smart, 37, of Cobleskill, NY, for Trespass.  She was issued an appearance ticket and released. She is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Zachary M. Zimmerman, 21, of Bethel, PA, for Violation of the Village Noise Ordinance.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Bradley E. Knoblauch, 22, of Constableville, NY,  for Violation of the Village Noise Ordinance.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to return to Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Desirae Almeida, 19, of Sharon Springs, NY, for Trespass.  She was issued an appearance ticket and released.  She is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

At 1:55 a.m. Cobleskill Police arrested Nicholas J. Stagliano, 22, of Walker Valley, NY, for Trespass.  He was issued an appearance ticket and released.  He is to appear in Cobleskill Town Court on May 9th at 5:00 p.m.

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SUNY Cobleskill Student Dies in Crash

Cobleskill, NY — At approximately 4 a.m. on April 22, six SUNY Cobleskill students were involved in a vehicular incident on Interstate 88 in the town of Maryland, New York. One fatality has been reported. Douglas Alvarez, 19, of Mamaroneck, New York, passed away as a result of his injuries. Douglas was a first-year Business Administration student at SUNY Cobleskill. All other students are either being treated at area hospitals or have been released. Details are emerging. New York State Police are investigating the incident.

President Marion Terenzio and the College extend their deepest sympathy to Douglas’s family, friends and the entire SUNY Cobleskill community in this time of loss. Support and counseling will be available on campus for anyone experiencing distress. Locations and times will be posted within the hour. In case of an emergency or crisis please call University Police at 518-255-5555.

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Schoharie County Historical Society Spring Meeting at Lansing Manor

Written By Editor on 4/21/17 | 4/21/17

Schoharie, NY – The annual Spring Program Meeting of the Schoharie County Historical Society will be held on Thursday, April 27, at 7 PM at the New York Power Authority’s Visitors Center in North Blenheim.  The public is invited to attend the meeting and visit the Lansing Manor House afterward.

Historical Society Director Carle Kopecky will introduce the Society’s new Director of Educational Outreach Melinda McTaggart, who will now manage the Lansing Manor operations among other duties. “Methods of interpreting historic house museums have changed dramatically in the past 20 years” says Mr. Kopecky. “We look forward to exploring ways these new techniques might be introduced at Lansing Manor.” Referring to the popular PBS TV series he adds, “I like to think of it as the Downton Abbey of Schoharie County and we should be presenting it that way!”

Lansing Manor has been restored as needed and maintained by the Power Authority since the 1970s.  The Manor is staffed by the Historical Society. "The addition of a new Director of Educational Outreach position is an opportunity for us (NYPA) to work more closely with the society to further interpret this fine piece of local history", said Mario Roefaro Community Relations Manager for NYPA. “We look forward to continuing to promote all that the Schoharie County Historical Society and NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center have to offer to residents and visitors alike.”

The Schoharie County Historical Society also operates the Old Stone Fort Museum Complex in Schoharie, publishes the semi-annual “Historical Review” of county history, and organizes lectures and historical events such as Stone Fort Days, History Fair and the upcoming Schoharie Street Movies Centennial on June 8 and 10.  More information about the Society, membership and volunteer opportunities, can be found on their website, www.theoldstonefort.org.

To learn more about visiting NYPA’s Blenheim-Gilboa Visitors Center and the Lansing Manor Complex please visit www.nypa.gov/BGVisitorsCenter.

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Women's Softball Game Rained Out

Written By Editor on 4/20/17 | 4/20/17

The SUNY Cobleskill Department of Sport & Exercise announced today that the women’s softball team’s home North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) doubleheader versus Cazenovia College that was originally scheduled to be played today at Fighting Tiger Park has been cancelled due to field conditions brought on by heavy rains.

This doubleheader will tentatively be made up at a later date based on the two teams’ upcoming schedule availability.

For further information regarding Fighting Tigers athletic team schedule adjustments; interested parties can consult the athletic program’s website at http://fightingtigers.cobleskill.edu or can contact the SUNY Cobleskill Department of Sport & Exercise via phone at (518) 255-5127 weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.  

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Men's College Lacrosse: SUNY Cobleskill Men Lose to Keuka College 19-5 in Conference Action

Keuka Park, N.Y.: The SUNY Cobleskill men’s lacrosse team suffered through a long afternoon on Wednesday falling to the host Wolves of Keuka College by a 19-5 margin in a North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) match-up. With the loss the Fighting Tigers drop to 3-7 overall on the year with a 0-5 record in league play while the Wolves improve to 6-5 overall including a 4-2 record versus conference opponents.
The host Wolves scored the contests first 13 goals to effectively seal the decision taking a 13-0 advantage into the locker room at halftime. Cobleskill would be outshot in the game 46-to-17 by Keuka while committing 27 turnovers on the day.
Once again junior attackman Jeremy Mowrey, Johnstown, N.Y., Johnstown High School/Herkimer Community College, led the Orange & Black offensively with two goals and an assist on the afternoon. The visitors also received solo goals from: freshman attackman Kieran Tierney, Marcellus, N.Y., Marcellus High School, sophomore attackman Sean Degnan, Monroe, N.Y., Monroe-Woodbury High School, and freshman attackman Robert Gioielli, Staten Island, N.Y., Monsignor Farrell High School, to round out their scoring.    
Cobleskill will return to action on Saturday April 22nd when they travel to Cazenovia, N.Y. to face the Wildcats of Cazenovia College in NEAC play beginning at 1:00 p.m.
FINAL GAME BOX:

Lacrosse Box Score (Final)
SUNY Cobleskill vs Keuka College (Apr 19, 2017 at Keuka Park, N.Y.)
 Summary 
SUNY Cobleskill (3-7, 0-5 NEAC) vs. Keuka College (6-5, 4-2 NEAC)
Date: Apr 19, 2017  Attendance: 142
Weather: A good day for ducks
SCORE BY PERIOD  
Total 
SUNY Cobleskill 
Keuka College 
19 
SUNY Cobleskill SCORING: GOALS: Jeremy Mowrey 2; Kieran Tierney 1; Sean Degnan 1; Robert Gioielli 1. ASSISTS: Edwin Martinez 1; Jeremy Mowrey 1.
Keuka College SCORING: GOALS: Mark Shattuck 5; Craig Gerhardt 4; Pat Giardino 3; Andrew Burns 2; Dan Blaessig 2; Robby Miller 1; Connor Tifft 1; Dillon Springer 1. ASSISTS: Craig Gerhardt 3; Dan Blaessig 2; Andrew Burns 2; Pat Giardino 2; Matt Mahalick 1; Mark Shattuck 1.
GOALIES - COBM: John Montaniz 3-7 (60:00 minutes, 31 shots-12 saves,
19 GA); KEUM: Jacob Wood 1-0 (37:35, 3-3, 0) , Kyle Andrake (22:25,8-3, 5).
PENALTIES - SUNY Cobleskill 2/1:00; Keuka College 3/2:30.



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