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The Best Gifts from Schoharie County

BOCES Electrical Trades Program Expands to Schoharie

Written By Editor on 1/31/21 | 1/31/21

In an effort to better meet the needs of students and component school districts, Capital Region BOCES is expanding the Electrical Trades program to the Schoharie Campus.

The program that prepares students for careers in electrical trades will now have labs and classrooms on the Albany and Schoharie campuses.

The change, Jeff Palmer, director of Career and Technical Education at Capital Region BOCES said, is necessary to best match the needs of students and school districts and to address the growing demand for the program.

“We look forward to making this exciting program with great career potential more available to the students in the Schoharie region,” Palmer said.

Just a few years ago, the program added a second classroom in Albany and now there is demand to add a third classroom, which will be located in Schoharie.

Students say they enjoy the opportunity the program offers.

“It’s a job that is going to be needed. It is a good career option. As more cars go electrical, they are going to need people to create the charging stations,” said Zachary Provost, who attends the program from Mohonasen,

“I like learning about electricity and wanted to get into the program to get a career with options and where I can make money,” added Joe Oystintravis, who attends the program from Berne-Knox-Westerlo.

The Electrical Trades program has been offered for decades and teaches the fundamental skills in electrical theory and through classroom instruction and hands-on shop lessons. Graduates can either further their education or enter the field through apprenticeships and go on to become successful residential, commercial and industrial wiring professionals.

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Roxbury Library February 2021 Hours

As a deterrent to the local spread of COVID-19, the Roxbury Library
Association is restricting the Roxbury Library's open hours to Mondays:
10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, for CURBSIDE PICKUP ONLY, during the month of
February 2021. Please call (607)-326-7901 or email
frontdesk@roxburylibraryonline.org to arrange for curbside pickup of
books and audiovisual items.

During the month of February 2021, the RLA Thrift Shoppe will be open on
Wednesdays: 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, on a BY-APPOINTMENT-ONLY basis.
Please call (607)-326-7901 to make a Wednesday morning appointment. To
make an appointment on another day, please call (607)-326-7901 or email
dian@roxburylibraryonline.org, and the library staff will arrange a
mutually convenient time for a visit to the RLA Thrift Shoppe.

Please note that the Roxbury Library Association cannot accept donations
of any kind during the month of February 2021.

The Roxbury Library Association regrets any inconvenience caused by the
Roxbury Library's limited COVID-19 hours.

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DEC Issues Guidance to Avoid Coyote Conflicts

Written By Editor on 1/27/21 | 1/27/21

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today issued guidance to help prevent conflicts between people and coyotes.

"Coyotes may become more territorial during the breeding and pup-rearing seasons, which in New York run from January through March, increasing the risk for potential conflicts with people and pets," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. "While coyotes are an important part of New York's ecosystem, New Yorkers are encouraged to be aware of the increased risks for conflicts and follow DEC's guidance to prevent coyote encounters."

The Eastern coyote is found in many habitats, from rural farmland and forests to populated suburban and urban areas across New York State. Coyotes are well adapted to suburban and even urban environments and tend to avoid conflicts with people. However, conflicts with people and pets may occur, particularly during the spring denning and pupping period. If coyotes learn to associate food, such as garbage or pet food, with peoples' homes, these animals may lose their natural fear of humans and increase the potential for close encounters or conflicts.

To reduce or prevent conflicts with coyotes, New Yorkers are encouraged to take the following steps:

  • Do not feed coyotes.
  • Do not leave food outside. Pet food and garbage attract coyotes and other wildlife and increase risks to people and pets:
    • Do not feed pets outside.
    • Prevent access to garbage.
    • Fence or enclose compost piles.
    • Eliminate availability of bird seed. Concentrations of birds and rodents that come to feeders can attract coyotes.
  • Do not allow coyotes to approach people or pets. If you see a coyote, be aggressive in your behavior: stand tall and hold your arms up or out to look as large as possible. If a coyote lingers for too long, make loud noises, wave your arms and throw sticks and stones.
  • Teach children to appreciate coyotes from a distance.
  • Do not allow pets to run free. Supervise outdoor pets to keep them safe from coyotes and other wildlife, especially at sunset and at night. Small dogs and cats are especially vulnerable.
  • Fence yards to deter coyotes. The fence should be tight to the ground, preferably extending six inches below ground level and taller than four feet.
  • Remove brush and tall grass from around homes to reduce protective cover for coyotes. Coyotes are typically secretive and like areas where they can hide.
  • Contact the local police department and DEC regional office for assistance if coyotes exhibit bold behaviors and have little or no fear of people, or if seen repeatedly during the daytime in a human-populated area or near residences. Seeing a coyote occasionally throughout the year is not evidence of bold behavior.
  • Ask neighbors to follow these steps to prevent coyote conflicts.

For additional information about the Eastern coyote and preventing conflicts with coyotes, visit the DEC webpages below:

Eastern Coyote

Coyote Conflicts

Feeding Wildlife: A Wrong Choice

Tips to Eliminate Wildlife Conflicts

Regional DEC Wildlife Offices

https://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html


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Audubon Highlights Carbon Reduction via Solid Waste Practices

Special Program featuring Otsego County and Delaware County Solid Waste Department Representatives

Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 7:00pm - ONLINE
Pre-registration is Required.

By: Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society
For more information contact:
Susan O'Handley, Publicity Chairperson, Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society, Oneonta, NY; (607) 643-5680; info@doas.us

Shane Digan, Planner and Recycling Coordinator, Otsego County Solid Waste Department, Cooperstown, NY; (607) 547-4225; sean digans@otsegocounty.com

Tyson Robb, Solid Waste Coordinator, Delaware County Solid Waste Department, Delhi, NY; (607) 832-5800; tyson.robb@co.delaware.ny.us
 

[ONEONTA, NY; REGIONAL] Please join Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society for this special online Zoom program on Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 7:00pm to learn about how our counties (both Delaware and Otsego) are working to reduce carbon through solid waste practices, recycling and composting. We all know that recycling is important, but do we know exactly why? What happens to the recyclable material once you put it in the recycling bin? What food composting options are available in the region and why is it important to compost? Does trash contribute to climate change (hint-yes!)?

Learn about legislation that is being introduced at the state and local level to improve recycling, composting, and solid waste management and more. Remember to bring all of your trash, recycling, and compost questions!
 

This is a FREE program.  Pre-Registration is required.
https://doas.us/event/solid-waste-recycling-composting-to-reduce-carbon/

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

About Our Presenters

Shane Digan, Planner and Recycling Coordinator for the Otsego County Solid Waste Department, works to increase recycling rates and extend programs to residents and businesses to promote responsible waste management while trying to keep costs low for the County. He maintains recycling resources on the County’s website, has utilized social media, television, and radio advertisements to promote sound recycling practices, helps manage the annual Household Hazardous Waste Day, and is currently working to grow the County’s food waste composting program. Shane is currently working on a “waste-smart” business certification and new recycling law for Otsego County.
Tyson Robb is the Solid Waste Coordinator in Delaware County. He is responsible for overseeing operations at The Landfill, Material Recovery Facility, and Compost Facility. Before working for the DPW Department Robb was an Environmental Technician with Delaware County’s Planning Department. Robb also teaches a Soil Science and Sustainability class through the Geography Department at SUNY Oneonta.  Robb is now focused on material management specifically landfill diversion and environmental sustainability.  Delaware County’s investment in state of the art composting and recycling facilities have lessened its carbon emissions through landfill gas and extended the life of its landfill. This regionally sustainable approach has benefits both locally and globally. 
This program is a follow up to an earlier panel discussion on Climate Action with specialists from our region. Find recordings of past programs at https://doas.us/webinars.   It is part of the DOAS Climate Action Leadership Training Program, funded in part through a 2020-21 Audubon in Action Grant from National Audubon Society.

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Audubon Hosts Naturalist and Photographer, Kyle Dudgeon for a Look into the Life of the Great Gray Owl

Friday, February 19, 2021, 7:30pm - ONLINE
Pre-registration is Required.


By: Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society
For more information contact: Susan O'Handley, Publicity Chairperson, Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society, Oneonta, NY; (607) 643-5680; info@doas.us

[ONEONTA, NY; REGIONAL] Of all the birds and wildlife that call the forests and mountains of Montana home, one species in particular leaves an impression on its observer unlike anything else. This species is the Great Gray Owl. After months of searching unsuccessfully for a breeding territory where one had to have existed, nature photographer and writer Kyle Dudgeon finally made his dream come true. He spent several weeks studying, photographing and advocating for a family of owls in the Bridger Mountains near Bozeman, MT. Join us as Kyle takes us through his experiences with dozens of great gray owls over two years in Montana, as well as the story of protecting a nest from the interests of logging.

Please join us online on Friday, February 19 at 7:30 PM for a virtual get-together with the Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society.  This is a FREE program.  Pre-Registration is required.

Registration Information can be found at the DOAS Website at
https://doas.us/event/in-search-of-the-great-gray-owl-kyle-dudgeon/

Above: Great Gray Owlets; Photo by Kyle Dudgeon.
https://doas.us/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/great-gray-kdudgeon.png

About the Presenter

Kyle Dudgeon is a 23 -year old nature photographer and writer based in Bozeman, Montana. A New York native, photography has led Kyle’s journeys across North America, capturing wild moments in incredible places. With his photographs and written word, Kyle strives to share with his following the power and emotion that the natural world possesses, in hopes of encouraging conservation of species and environments at risk. In 2019, Kyle Dudgeon Creative was founded on an idea to translate a passion for wild things and wild places into a means of visual storytelling. A project involving Great Gray Owls in the Bridger Mountains of Montana was Kyle’s first true introduction into what he hopes will be a long career in the conservation realm.
 
The Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society (DOAS) offers programs year-round that are free and open to the public including member meeting programs, bird-watching field trips and special events.  DOAS operates the Franklin Mountain Hawkwatch, hiking trails  and a summer day camp program at the Audubon Sanctuary just south of Oneonta, NY.  

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LTE: Seeking Coaches for Baseball

I am 25 years old from Dallas, Georgia, and I have autism. I am also the commissioner/director of the Alternative Baseball Organization, a 501c3 authentic baseball experience for teens 15+ and adults with autism and other disabilities to gain social and physical skills for success in life on and off the diamond. It takes 6 months to fill a full team due to the lack of catered services available in most areas for teens and adults with disabilities. So in spite of the pandemic, recruitment for 2021 has begun virtually. We are looking for a volunteer coach/manager, volunteers, and players to help us start new programs serving those in Schoharie County and the surrounding area in addition to our other Atlantic programs in South Philly, Chester County, Hudson County (NJ), Columbus (OH), Wayne County/Detroit (MI), Watertown (NY), Louisville (KY), Chattanooga, Nashville, Buffalo (NY), Bangor (ME), and many more teams in Georgia and North Carolina tentatively set to start in late Spring-summer 2021. We are different from other programs in that teams travel to other areas, play on traditional high school size fields, and play using the same rule-set as the pros on television. The organization provides equipment and resources to help such a program become successful.

When I was much younger, I had speech issues, anxiety issues, and more that came with having autism… I wasn't able to participate in competitive sports due to the developmental delays, in addition to social stigma (preconceived ideas) from those who think what one with autism can and cannot accomplish. With the help of my mom, teachers, mentors, and coaches who believed in me, I've gotten to where I am today in my life: To live with the goal to inspire, raise awareness, and acceptance for autism and special needs globally through the sport of baseball. 

As many with autism graduate from high school in many areas, services plateau. In a lot of suburban and rural areas, there are no services for those to continue their path toward independence. Many travel to find the limited services which may or may not be available to their specific needs. Realizing a lack of general incentive and opportunities for those on the spectrum, I started this organization to give others on the spectrum/special needs the opportunity to be accepted for who they are and to be encouraged to be the best they can be!

The program follows Major League rules (wood bats, base stealing, dropped third strike, etc.), and is a true typical team experience for others on the autism spectrum and special needs to help develop social skills for later in life. Alternative Baseball also has clubs in 30+ states who are also preparing for their late Spring start dates. In 2019, the organization was commemorated as a Community Hero at an Atlanta Braves game and has been featured on ESPN's BASEBALL TONIGHT and NBC's Weekday TODAY Show.

I wanted to let you know we are looking for a volunteer coach/manager, players, and volunteers to help us start new programs serving those throughout Schoharie County and the surrounding area. We must find the coach/manager in order to begin. We have had past success from media putting out the word in their communities. Players can be of all experience levels. We take them from where they start out at (whether they require to be pitched to slow overhand or hit off the tee), and help develop their physical and social skills. I am available for interviews via Zoom or by phone (due to COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.) and can also provide a multitude of B-Roll footage through our Google Drive. Any help is appreciated! Thank you for your time! I look forward to one day having the opportunity to serve your community for hopefully many years to come!

(See our segment from ESPN's Baseball Tonight here!: http://www.espn.com/video/clip?id=23353934. Also, please take at look at my TedXAtlanta talk on providing more opportunities in and outside of sports for those with autism and other special needs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0RGXug-WV4). Sign up at http://alternativebaseball.org/

Sincerely,
Taylor Duncan

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Audubon joins Hanford Mills Museum for Ice Harvest Festival

Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 7:00pm - ONLINE
Pre-registration is Required.

By: Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society
For more information contact: Susan O'Handley, Publicity Chairperson, Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society, Oneonta, NY; (607) 643-5680; info@doas.us
By: Hanford Mills Museum
For more information contact: Kajsa Harley, Education and Curatorial Initiatives Manager, Hanford Mills Museum, East Meredith, NY; (607) 278-5744; kajsah@hanfordmills.org

[ONEONTA, NY; EAST MEREDITH, NY; REGIONAL] Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society (DOAS) joins Hanford Mills Museum’s Ice Harvest Festival in a special presentation on Tuesday, February 2, 7pm on ZOOM to highlight our region’s Bald Eagle population. DOAS Co-President, Andy Mason will discuss the history of eagle conservation in New York State. He will be joined by DOAS Director and Research Coordinator, Tom Salo, who will overview eagle identification with an emphasis on the differences between bald eagles and golden eagles. Tom will also talk about current eagle conservation efforts being undertaken by DOAS.

This is a FREE program.  Pre-Registration is required.
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uhNfJE2fQ4KychIILdgK7Q


Bald Eagle, Cannonsville - Photo by Rod Sutton

Birding for Bald Eagles is presented as part of Hanford Mills Museum’s Ice Harvest Festival, which will be virtual this year because of COVID-19. The Ice Harvest Festival is usually held on the first Saturday in February.

“Because we cannot gather in person on February 6, we are planning online events and at-home activities on that day and the weeks surrounding it. The DOAS Eagle presentation and self-guided driving tour are wonderful activities that people can enjoy safely this winter,” said Liz Callahan, Executive Director of Hanford Mills Museum.

Visit hanfordmills.org for details on other ice harvest activities.

From Liz Callahan, Executive Director, Hanford Mills Museum
“Ice harvests were once an essential part of winter in rural communities. Before there was refrigeration, ice was needed to preserve agricultural products and to keep food cold in the warmer months. Hanford Mills Museum celebrates this rural tradition with the Ice Harvest Festival.”

Hanford Mills Museum operates an authentic water- and steam-powered historic site. They inspire audiences of all ages to explore connections among energy, technology, natural resources, and entrepreneurship in rural communities, with a focus on sustainable choices.


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Residents of Federal Disaster Areas Get Second Chance for Medicare Enrollment

If you’re eligible for Medicare, you can enroll and choose a plan any time during the three months before and after the month you turn 65. After that, you usually only have one chance a year: the annual election period (AEP). Also referred to as Medicare open enrollment, AEP runs yearly from October 15 to December 7. Dave Rich, CEO of Ensurem, a Florida-based insurance technology and product distribution firm, says, “In most cases, if you wanted to enroll or change plans for 2021 and didn’t get it done by December 7, you’re out of luck.(1) Or maybe not, depending on where you live.” Medicare-eligible individuals residing in certain states could qualify for special enrollment periods.

Medicare special enrollment periods (SEPs), Rich explains, are available to residents of Federal Emergency Management Agency-declared disaster areas. While the special enrollment periods apply only to residents of these areas, a significant number of seniors may nonetheless be eligible.

This SEP gives individuals the opportunity to enroll in, disenroll from, or switch Medicare health or prescription drug plans and is open to those who:

  • live (or lived at the start of the incident period,) in an area for which FEMA has declared an emergency or a major disaster (fire, flood, hurricane, etc.); and
  • had another Medicare enrollment period at the time of the incident period (such as AEP, October 15-December 7); and
  • did not enroll or make a change during that enrollment period.(2)

The special enrollment opportunity, notes Rich, runs for four full calendar months after the declaration of emergency. This means, residents of an area declared a disaster zone by FEMA as long ago as October will still be eligible to enroll or make a change in their Medicare plans for 2021 up until February, and in some cases, even March.

“Given the disruption and challenges of 2020,” he says, “this opportunity may be of interest to Medicare-eligible individuals who for one reason or another did not enroll in Medicare or change their plans during the annual enrollment period and would like to do so now.”

States containing FEMA-declared disaster areas in which SEPs may be available from January to March, for example, include Alabama, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Texas and Wyoming.(3)

Medicare-eligible individuals residing in these states and wishing to know if their particular county is part of a FEMA-declared disaster area can contact Medicare or FEMA directly. For those looking for quicker answers, there is an alternative:

“As specialists in Medicare insurance, we are aware how confusing it is to navigate the Medicare landscape, especially with these FEMA exceptions which go unnoticed by most beneficiaries. At Ensurem, we are on top of all Medicare news, changes, and processes,” says Rich.

Ensurem is up to date on this information and willing and ready to verify anyone’s eligibility for this special enrollment period. They can be reached from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET at (800) 729-5109.

About Ensurem:
Ensurem, headquartered in Clearwater, FL, is a leading technology and product distribution company serving carriers and consumers within the massive U.S. senior market. The company provides end-to-end solutions for carriers, including product development, digital marketing and consumer-centric front ends and back end. For more information, please visit Ensurem.com.

1.    “Medicare Enrollment Periods: When to Sign Up.” Medicare, medicare.gov/blog/medicare-enrollment-period-2020.
2.    Guidance Portal, hhs.gov/guidance/document/special-enrollment-period-sep-individuals-affected-fema-declared-weather-related-emergency.
3.    “Declared Disasters.” Declared Disasters | FEMA.gov, fema.gov/disasters/disaster-declarations.


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Enjoy Virtual Ice Harvest Festival events at home, February 2-6

The region’s “coolest” tradition will continue, but in a new way.  

Learn about the 19th century ice trade, find out where to view eagles, test your knowledge in trivia games, watch new videos about ice harvesting and the science of ice, take part in a winter scavenger hunt, and watch online programming from Hanford Mills educators. Some events are scheduled, other resources and activities are available for you to enjoy when you choose. For the latest information, go to our Ice Harvest webpage.

Scheduled Events 
 

Tuesday, February 2, 7 pm
Birding for Bald Eagles
The Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society (DOAS) will offer a special online presentation to highlight the region’s Bald Eagle population. DOAS Co-President Andy Mason and DOAS Director and Research Coordinator Tom Salo will discuss the history of eagle conservation in New York State, eagle identification, and a new self-guided driving tour and map, developed by DOAS, that will allow people to independently visit sites that are good for eagle viewing. Register for the free program at doas.us.

Thursday, February 4 at 7 pm
Winter’s Coolest Crop: Ice Harvesting History and Culture
Andrew Robichaud, Assistant Professor of History at Boston University, joins HMM staff Liz Callahan and Kajsa Harley for a free online presentation. Robichaud’s book-in-progress, tentatively titled On Ice: Transformations in American Life, is a history of climate, ice, and the ice trade in North America, and explores the cultural and economic ice age in nineteenth-century America. Along with a discussion of the history of ice harvesting in the Northeast, they will discuss how Hanford Mills celebrates the historic community tradition of ice harvesting. Register in advance at http://bit.ly/iceharvestwebinar.

Friday, February 5, 7-9 pm
Science Trivia Night with the Science Discovery Center
The A.J. Read Science Discovery Center and SUNY Oneonta Planetarium are hosting a three-round online trivia game on Zoom. Participants can play as a team (2-5 people) or play solo. The trivia will be “ice” themed, from glaciers, to ice planets, to the history of ice and refrigeration. Register in advance at https://suny.oneonta.edu/science-discovery-center.

Saturday, February 6, 11 am
Ice Harvesting and Ice Houses Family Program
Luke Murphy, Hanford Mills education coordinator, will offer a family-friendly online presentation. Learn how ice houses work and experiment with different materials to determine what insulates ice the best. The program is free and you can register in advance at https://bit.ly/familyiceharvestprogram

Enjoy a Winter Tradition in a New Way
Our goal for the 2021 virtual Ice Harvest Festival is to offer a fun and rewarding shared experience that many of us are missing these days. We will be premiering three Ice Harvesting videos, created by the Cooperstown Graduate Program, that explore the ice harvesting process, the science of ice and ice houses, and the water cycle and climate change. A Winter Scavenger Hunt will be posted here, as well as other winter crafts and activities you can enjoy.

We've come up with a Virtual Ice Harvest Festival Playlist on Spotify, give it a listen! Let us know if you have a song to add. 

Have a question about ice harvesting? Ask Hanford Mills, and we'll answer on our website or Facebook.

We also encourage you to submit your Ice Harvest photos and memories, which we are sharing on our Facebook page

Buy Local

Please support the restaurants that have provided soup at past Ice Harvests, and also the local businesses, farmers, and artisans that have exhibited at Ice Harvests. Here is a list of who came to the February 2020 Ice Harvest.  Treat yourself to some delicious take-out as you enjoy the virtual Ice Harvest Festival.

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Greene County Senior Menu for March 2021

The following is the weekly nutrition menu offered by Greene County Department of
Human Services’ Senior Nutrition Program. All meals include: Meat/Alternative Entrée,
Vegetables & Fruit, Bread, Milk (Home Delivered Meals only) & Dessert. Tartar sauce is
served on fish days. Menu is subject to change based on product availability and
circumstance.
All persons OVER 60 (and spouses) are invited to receive, Monday - Friday, for a
suggested contribution of $4.00. Each site serves the same noon-time menu item for the
day.
Please make sure that you sign-up, at least a day in advance, if you wish lunch from any of
the senior nutrition sites. We also ask if you have signed up and become unable to show,
please call us as soon as you can to cancel. This helps to reduce our food waste.
AS WE ARE STILL UNDER COVID GUIDELINES, CENTERS ARE NOT OPEN FOR
CONGREGATE MEALS. IT IS TAKE-OUT ONLY. PLEASE REMEMBER TO CALL
THE CENTER AT LEAST A DAY IN ADVANCE TO ORDER.
Senior Nutrition Sites are closed on legal holidays and inclement weather.
Acra: Acra Community Center, Old Route 23, Cairo, 518-622-9898
Athens: Rivertown Senior Center, 39 Second St, Athens, 518-945-2700
Catskill: Robert Antonelli Senior Center, 15 Academy Street, Catskill, 518-943-1343
Jewett: Jewett Municipal Building, Route 23C, Jewett, 518-263-4392
March 1 – 5, 2021

MONDAY – BBQ Chicken Thighs, Sweet Potatoes Mash, Broccoli, and Applesauce
TUESDAY – Pork Chops w/ Gravy, Mashed Potato, Green Beans, and Peaches
WEDNESDAY – Spaghetti w/ Meatballs, Italian Mixed Vegetables and Diced Pears w/
Cookie
THURSDAY – Hot Roast Beef w/ Gravy, Baked Potato, Roasted Carrots, and Fresh Fruit
FRIDAY – Lemon Tarragon Fish, Brown Rice, Asparagus, and Mixed Berries w/ Whipped
Topping

GREENE COUNTY SENIOR NUTRITION PROGRAM

The following is the weekly nutrition menu offered by Greene County Department of
Human Services’ Senior Nutrition Program. All meals include: Meat/Alternative Entrée,
Vegetables & Fruit, Bread, Milk (Home Delivered Meals only) & Dessert. Tartar sauce is
served on fish days. Menu is subject to change based on product availability and
circumstance.
All persons OVER 60 (and spouses) are invited to receive, Monday - Friday, for a
suggested contribution of $4.00. Each site serves the same noon-time menu item for the
day.
Please make sure that you sign-up, at least a day in advance, if you wish lunch from any of
the senior nutrition sites. We also ask if you have signed up and become unable to show,
please call us as soon as you can to cancel. This helps to reduce our food waste.
AS WE ARE STILL UNDER COVID GUIDELINES, CENTERS ARE NOT OPEN FOR
CONGREGATE MEALS. IT IS TAKE-OUT ONLY. PLEASE REMEMBER TO CALL
THE CENTER AT LEAST A DAY IN ADVANCE TO ORDER.
Senior Nutrition Sites are closed on legal holidays and inclement weather.
Acra: Acra Community Center, Old Route 23, Cairo, 518-622-9898
Athens: Rivertown Senior Center, 39 Second St, Athens, 518-945-2700
Catskill: Robert Antonelli Senior Center, 15 Academy Street, Catskill, 518-943-1343
Jewett: Jewett Municipal Building, Route 23C, Jewett, 518-263-4392

March 8 – 12, 2021

MONDAY – Chicken Divan, Brown Rice, Carrots, and Tropical Fruit
TUESDAY – Stuffed Shells Marinara, Spinach, and Chocolate Mousse w/ Mixed Berries
WEDNESDAY – BBQ Pulled Pork, Baked Beans, Green Beans, and Fruited Jell-O
THURSDAY – Hungarian Goulash, Whole Wheat Egg Noodles, Italian Vegetables and
Fresh Fruit
FRIDAY – Fish Florentine, Herb Roasted Potato Wedges, Sautéed Zucchini & Tomatoes,
and Angel Food Cake w/ Strawberries & Whipped Topping

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Schoharie County COVID Vaccination Information

Written By Editor on 1/26/21 | 1/26/21

Please feel free to pass this information along to those who meet the criteria for the clinics.

 

Schoharie County Department of Health is conducting two Vaccine Clinics this week:

 

ESSENTIAL WORKERS (Only those Defined below)Thursday, 1/28 from 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm in the main County Office Building basement.  You MUST make an appointment, as we are NOT permitted to reserve vaccine for specific individuals, and we do not allow walk-in patients.  Please check the county website at https://www4.schohariecounty-ny.gov/ for a registration link on Wednesday, 1/27 at 9:15 am (1/2 of allotted appointments) and 6:00 pm (1/2 of allotted appointments).  We expect appointments to fill up very quickly, so if you receive a message that states no appointments or clinic available, the clinic is already full.  Please continue to be patient as we will continue to schedule clinics as more vaccine is received. If you are unable to register for an appointment at this clinic, please be patient.  Do NOT call Department of Health, Office of Emergency Services, or Office for the Aging (or any other county agency) – as we can do nothing to help you get a vaccine quicker.  You will continue to be notified of upcoming clinics.

 

OVER 65 YEARS OLDFriday, 1/29 from 11:00 am – 2:00 pm in the main County Office Building basement.  You MUST make an appointment, as we are NOT permitted to reserve vaccine for specific individuals, and we do not allow walk-in patients.  Please check the county website at https://www4.schohariecounty-ny.gov/ for a registration link on Thursday, 1/28 at 9:15 am.  We expect appointments to fill up very quickly, so if you receive a message that states no appointments or clinic available, the clinic is already full.  Please continue to be patient as we will continue to schedule clinics as more vaccine is received. If you are unable to register for an appointment at this clinic, please be patient.  Do NOT call Department of Health, Office of Emergency Services, or Office for the Aging (or any other county agency) – as we can do nothing to help you get a vaccine quicker.  You will continue to be notified of upcoming clinics.

 

*PLEASE DO NOT show up more than 5 minutes prior to your appointment time, as this prevents us from ensuring adequate social distancing.

 

**PLEASE NOTE: You will be pre-screened for reasoning for signing up for a vaccine and must fit into the category you are making an appointment for.  You will be required to show Identification proving your employer, title and/or age.  Anyone not fitting into the category for which they make an appointment will be removed and will not receive a vaccination.

 

***ESSENTIAL WORKERS INCLUDE ONLY THOSE LISTED BELOW:

  • High-risk hospital workers (emergency room workers, ICU staff and Pulmonary Department staff)
  • Residents and staff at nursing homes and other congregate care facilities
  • Federally Qualified Health Center employees
  • EMS workers
  • Coroners, medical examiners and certain funeral workers
  • Staff and residents at OPWDD, OMH and OASAS facilities
  • Urgent Care providers
  • Individuals administering COVID-19 vaccines, including local health department staff
  • All Outpatient/Ambulatory front-line, high-risk health care workers of any age who provide direct in-person patient care
  • All staff who are in direct contact with patients (i.e., intake staff)
  • All front-line, high-risk public health workers who have direct contact with patients, including those conducting COVID-19 tests, handling COVID-19 specimens and COVID-19 vaccinations
  • This includes, but is not limited to,
    • Doctors who work in private medical practices and their staff 
    • Doctors who work in hospital-affiliated medical practices and their staff
    • Doctors who work in public health clinics and their staff
    • Registered Nurses
    • Specialty medical practices of all types
    • Dentists and Orthodontists and their staff
    • Psychiatrists and Psychologists and their staff
    • Physical Therapists and their staff
    • Optometrists and their staff
    • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Aides
    • Home care workers
    • Hospice workers
  • Staff of nursing homes/skilled nursing facilities who did not receive COVID vaccination through the Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program
  • First Responder and Support Staff for First Responder Agencies
    • Fire Service
      • State Fire Service, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
      • Local Fire Services, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
    • Police and Investigators
      • State Police, including Troopers
      • State Park Police, DEC Police, Forest Rangers
      • SUNY Police
      • Sheriffs' Offices
      • County Police Departments and Police Districts
      • City, Town, and Village Police Departments
      • Transit of other Public Authority Police Departments
      • State Field Investigators, including Department of Motor Vehicles, State Commission of Correction, Justice Center, Department of Financial Services, Inspector General, Department of Tax and Finance, Office of Children and Family Services, and State Liquor Authority
    • Public Safety Communications
      • Emergency Communication and Public Safety Answering Point Personnel, including dispatchers and technicians
    • Other Sworn and Civilian Personnel
      • Court Officers
      • Other Police or Peace Officers
      • Support or Civilian Staff for Any of the above services, agencies, or facilities
  • Corrections
    • State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Personnel, including correction and parole officers
    • Local Correctional Facilities, including correction officers
    • Local Probation Departments, including probation officers
    • State Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
    • Local Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
  • In-person college instructors
  • P-12 Schools
    • P-12 school or school district faculty or staff (includes all teachers, substitute teachers, student teachers, school administrators, paraprofessional staff and support staff including bus drivers)
    • Contractors working in a P-12 school or school district (including contracted bus drivers)
  • Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt group Childcare Providers
  • Employees or Support Staff of Licensed or Registered Childcare Setting
  • Grocery store workers
  • Public Transit
    • Airline and airport employees
    • Passenger railroad employees
    • Subway and mass transit employees (i.e., MTA, LIRR, Metro North, NYC Transit, Upstate transit)
    • Ferry employees
    • Port Authority employees
    • Public bus employees
  • Individuals living in a homeless shelter where sleeping, bathing or eating accommodations must be shared with individuals and families who are not part of the same household
  • Individual working (paid or unpaid) in a homeless shelter where sleeping, bathing or eating accommodations must be shared by individuals and families who are not part of the same household, in a position where there is potential for interaction with shelter residents

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