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Conesville: God's Country

Written By Editor on 6/25/14 | 6/25/14


It was hot, but not so bad as to ruin the afternoon, as I arrived at the Conesville Town Hall in anticipation of learning more about the "forgotten town" of Schoharie County from its recently elected Supervisor Bill Federice. I wasn't disappointed by my visit, as I soon see the friendly character and can do spirit of the town exemplified by the makeshift public library available in the town hall for residents.

Although often forgotten in casual economic and political conversation, the Town of Conesville is looking to capitalize on its agrarian roots and beautiful scenery to grow the county's second smallest community while remaining true to their humble, neighborly oriented attitudes.

Located at the south-eastern tip of Schoharie County, citizens of Conesville are closer in proximity to Windham and Stamford than to Schoharie or Cobleskill, creating a disconnect between their concerns and needs with that of the rest of the county's perception and understanding. But Conesville marches on despite those differences. 

Blessed with easily Schoharie County's greatest and most picturesque landscapes, local residents have turned those natural marvels into advantages by utilizing the fertile land of God's Country, whether it be in several thriving dairy farms, a successful sawmill and grade stake operation, or Eric Dahlberg's unique Elk farm.


My heart is captured by Conesville's majestic and serene viewpoints, but none compared to the peak of Huntersfield Mountain, where standing at the county's highest point, I could view the lush greenery that encompassed the town for miles stretching into the horizon. 



Furthermore, the mostly wooded town offers outdoorsmen of all stripes ample opportunity to immerse themselves in a series of wildlife based activities, including but not limited to: grouse and turkey hunting, fishing, and for the truly adventurous, hiking South Mountain's visually explosive eight mile trail along its ridge.

Still though, Conesville struggles with many of the same problems seen across rural communities in Upstate New York, namely a lack of dependable internet and cellphone coverage that is spotty at best combined with the loss of the town's next generation to college; often, never to return as permanent members of the town. 

However, local officials and residents are looking to reverse some of those trends in coming years by way of expanding the town's available broadband capabilities, introducing all that the community has to offer with a new website (being designed for free by a professional in the field), and most importantly, encouraging Conesville's approximate seven hundred citizens in change to look toward the future, while remembering what has made them great in the past and present. 

As we prepare to part ways after discussing his town in earnest, Mr. Federice and I enjoy a moment of peaceful serenity standing outside the town hall near 990V. I openly comment on the quietness of Conesville, leading Mr. Federice to agree with regard to the main road. As I drive away, my thoughts wander on the small, almost-family like community, and I catch my smile in the mirror as I could see myself here one day to stay.
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