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The Best Gifts from Schoharie County

Showing posts with label Iroquois Museum. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Iroquois Museum. Show all posts

Explore Nature Trails at the Iroquois Indian Museum May 23

Written By Cicero on 5/12/15 | 5/12/15


Howes Cave, New York - The Iroquois Indian Museum, in partnership with the Audubon Society of the Capital Region, presents a Bird Walk and a live birds of prey show starting at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 23.

Everyone is welcome to this free, public event at the Museum. 

Join members of the Audubon Society while exploring the Museum's hiking trails. Be sure to bring your binoculars to see what spring migrating birds are in the museum's forest and fields.

"There is so much to see on the Natural Trail at the Museum. Having members of Audubon with us guarantees an enhanced experience for our guests," said Iroquois Indian Museum Director Stephanie Shultes. 

The local chapter of the National Audubon Society is dedicated to the protection, conservation, and enjoyment of birds, wildlife, and the environment in the Capital Region. 

After the walk, attendees can take a seat in the museum's new, outdoor pavilion and enjoy a Live Birds of Prey show at 10:30 a.m., presented by Kelly Martin, president of the New York State Wildlife Rehabilitation Council. The council is a not-for-profit, statewide organization that has been in existence for more than 20 years.

Explore Nature Trails at the Iroquois Indian Museum May 23

Written By Cicero on 4/28/15 | 4/28/15

Howes Cave, New York - The Iroquois Indian Museum, in partnership with the Audubon Society of the Capital Region, presents a Bird Walk and a live birds of prey show starting at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 23. 

Everyone is welcome to this free public event at the Museum.

Join members of the Audubon Society while exploring the Museum's hiking trails. Be sure to bring your binoculars to see what spring migrating birds are in the museum's forest and fields.

"There is so much to see on the Nature Trail at the Museum. Having members of Audubon Society with us guarantees an enhanced experience for our guests," said Iroquois Indian Museum Director Stephanie Shultes.

The local chapter of the National Audubon Society is dedicated to the protection, conservation and enjoyment of birds, wildlife and the environment in the Capital Region.

After the walk, you can take a seat in the museum's new, outdoor pavilion and enjoy a Live Birds of Prey show at 10:30 a.m., presented by Kelly Martin, president of the New York State Wildlife Rehabilitation Council. The council is a not-for-profit, statewide organization that has been in existence for more than 20 years.

Early Technology Day at the Iroquois Museum

Written By Cicero on 4/8/15 | 4/8/15

The public is invited to the annual Early Technology Day at the Iroquois Indian Museum on Saturday, April 18th from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Join the Museum for Flint Knapping demonstrations and workshops, fire by friction demonstrations, atl-atl shoot and other demonstrations of early technology.

In addition to on-site demonstrations of the flint knapping process, which is the ancient art of making chipped stone tools, visitors are encouraged to bring their artifacts for comparison and identification to the museum's extensive collection of point-type artifacts. 

This year's theme is to replicate adena points using a rather unique chert type to our area called Oriskany. It has a grainy but glassy texture, best worked with mostly percussion. There will be many examples of points, replica tools, and local archaeological displays.

A schedule of the day's events will be posted during the event and will include Knapping demonstrations throughout the day, workshops at cycled time slops for adults and youth nine years and up, atl-atl throwing at posted time slots, and other demonstrations of early technology.

For more information, please call the Iroquois Indian Museum at 518-296-8949 or visit their website at www.iroquoismuseum.org.

Buckskin to Bikinis Exhibit Opens at Iroquois Museum

Written By Cicero on 4/2/15 | 4/2/15


Opening Saturday, April 4th from 1 to 3 pm, the Iroquois Museum's Buckskin to Bikinis exhibit will kick off the season with a talk by Dr. Jessica Metcalfe, a Turtle Mountain Chippewa from North Dakota.

Dr. Metcalfe writes about Native American art, fashion, and design, while she owns and operates the Beyond Buckskin Boutique, which sells Native American fashion. 

The Buckskin to Bikinis exhibition is designed for the fashion over in everyone. The show highlights the work of well-known Iroquois designers, including Tammy Beauvais, Bruno Henry, and Niio Perkins and introduces many upcoming Iroquois fashionistas. 

Diversity, artistry, elegance, and story are element that can be viewed in this well-timed exhibit.

Haudenosaunee cultural concepts of peace, power, and righteousness take shape with beads, bangles and bling to create garments and accessories to wear to the beach, for special occasions, or admire in a glass museum case.

“From hand-painted bikinis to high-heeled sneakers, street wear to evening wear, Iroquois fashion is distinct, contemporary, and infused with Haudenosaunee cultural symbols, traditional materials, and political punch,” said Exhibition Curator Colette Lemmon

The exhibit is set to run through November 30th, 2015. 

Iroquois Museum Appoints New Director

Written By Cicero on 3/30/15 | 3/30/15

The Trustees of the Iroquois Indian Museum are proud to announce the appointment of Stephanie Shultes of Middleburgh, NY, as the new Director of the Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY.  Her long involvement with the Museum in many capacities, her friendships  with Iroquois, Museum members, and the community and her knowledge of Iroquois culture and arts singled her out as the perfect person to lead the Museum forward.


 In 1985, Ms Shultes began to volunteer at the Museum when the Museum was located at the Old Stone Fort in Schoharie. Her interest in the Iroquois grew and she went to graduate school at SUNY Albany to receive her Masters in Anthropology in 1988. She continued to volunteer but in 1991, just before the Museum opened in its new home in Howes Cave she became the Museum’s Curator. 

Because the Museum has a small staff, Ms. Shultes has become involved in many aspects of the Museum from curating the collection, to researching Iroquois arts and mounting exhibitions, to maintaining our web site, monitoring and designing our Facebook page and fundraising. She has always been innovative and determined to showcase the Museum and its uniqueness. Notable exhibits that she curated and researched were the two Native Americans in the Performing Arts exhibits, From Ballet to Rock and Roll and From Broadway to HollywoodBaseball’s League of Nations and the Indian Ink exhibits. Steph has designed many of the Museum’s publications which include Schoharie Mohawks, by John Ferguson and the catalogSkyworld to Turtle Island. Ms. Shultes headed the committee that produced our Learning Longhouse education pages on our website and then designed and published those pages. Most recently she was both the impetus and the fundraiser for the new amphitheater roof, an achievement she is very proud of.

Her passion for photography has assisted the Museum. She is often seen photographing Museum events and she has photographed much of the Museum’s collection. Many of her photographs have been published in books about the Iroquois and some are available in the Museum’s gift shop. She has also traveled to southern Africa, to the Grand Tetons, Yosemite and Yellowstone to photograph animals and landscapes.

Ms. Shultesis very generous and diligent in all her endeavors. She has a special attachment to cats and befriended the Museum’s cat, Little Boy. He has become a very important ambassador for the Museum and her latest project is a GoFundMe campaign in which Little Boy is the star, raising money for the Museum Ms. Shultes created the video in which Little Boy details all the work he does at the Museum and encourages people to be donors to his ‘forever home.’

The Iroquois Museum was established in 1980 and is located in Howes Cave, NY, 40 miles west of Albany. For more information please contact the Museum at 518-296-8949 or info@iroquoismuseum.org.

Iroquois Museum Features Fashion Designers in ‘Buckskin to Bikinis’ Exhibit

Written By Cicero on 3/3/15 | 3/3/15

HOWES CAVE, NEW YORK --Glamour and glitz are in style at the Iroquois Indian Museum as its new exhibition,   “Buckskin to Bikinis: Haudenosaunee Wearable Art,*” opens on April 2 for the 2015 season.

The exhibition is designed for the fashion lover in everyone.  The show highlights the work of well-known Iroquois designers including Tammy Beauvais, Bruno Henry, and Niio Perkins and introduces many upcoming Iroquois fashionistas.  Diversity, artistry, elegance, and story are elements that can be viewed in this well-timed exhibit.

Haudenosaunee cultural concepts of peace, power, and righteousness take shape with beads, bangles and bling to create garments and accessories to wear to the beach, for special occasions, or admire in a glass museum case.

“From hand-painted bikinis to high-heeled sneakers, street wear to evening wear, Iroquois fashion is distinct, contemporary, and infused with Haudenosaunee cultural symbols, traditional materials, and political punch,” said Exhibition Curator Colette Lemmon.

During April and November, the Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday from 12 to 4 p.m. on Sunday. From May 1 through Oct. 31, Museum hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. 

Admission is $8 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-12. Special group, student and senior pricing are available. For more information, contact the Museum at 518-296-8949 or visit www.iroquoismuseum.org.

Celebrations!

To celebrate the exhibit opening of “Buckskin to Bikinis,” a reception will be held from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, April 4.  Dr. Jessica Metcalfe will give a special talk. Dr. Metcalfe is Turtle Mountain Chippewa from North Dakota and writes about Native American art, fashion, and design. She owns and operates the Beyond Buckskin Boutique, which sells Native American fashion.

About the Museum

The Iroquois Indian Museum is an educational institution dedicated to fostering understanding of Iroquois culture using Iroquois art as a window to that culture.  The Museum is a venue for promoting Iroquois art and artists, and a meeting place for all peoples to celebrate Iroquois culture and diversity.  As an anthropological institution, it is informed by research on archaeology, history, and the common creative spirit of modern artists and craftspeople.

The Museum represents the world’s most comprehensive collection of modern Iroquois art work. This collection celebrates the ancient unity of the Iroquois still expressed in the creative spirit of today’s artists. A special interactive children’s area introduces young visitors to Iroquois traditions through a variety of crafts, games and technologies. A guide-posted Nature Park of 45 acres is open year round for walks, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing.

*This exhibition is supported in part with grants from the Coby Foundation, LTD and the New York Council for the Humanities.

Unique Holiday Gifts Go on Sale at Iroquois Museum

Written By Cicero on 11/17/14 | 11/17/14

HOWES CAVE, N.Y. -- Starting on Friday, Nov. 28, and continuing through Nov. 30, the Iroquois Indian Museum has a wide variety of items on sale that are perfect for holiday giving.

Throughout these days, the public will receive a 10 percent discount on all purchases. Museum members receive 15 percent off their purchases. Items include pottery, handmade jewelry, artwork, posters, music, children’s gifts and more. (Discounts do not apply to books or consignment artwork.)

These are also the final three days to see the Museum’s current exhibit, standing in Two Worlds: Iroquois in 2014. Museum hours through Nov. 30 are Thursdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays from 12 Noon to 4 p.m. (Closed Thanksgiving Day.)

The exhibit features over 30 Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) artists and focuses upon contemporary concerns that warrant their attention and creative comment.  Exhibition works (artwork and poetry) include those that explore boundaries and borders, environment, hydro-fracking, economy, gaming, the digital/disposable age, sports mascots, the impact of national/international events and decisions, the role of tradition and community, and the state of the arts.

For more information about the sale, exhibition and admission, visit www.iroquoismuseum.org and like the Museum on Facebook.
Standing in Two Worlds: Iroquois in 2014 is supported in part by grants from the New York Council for the Humanities and the generous donations of individuals.

October Storytelling Sundays at the Iroquois Museum

Written By Cicero on 10/2/14 | 10/2/14

Storytelling Sundays take place October 12, 19, 26 in the Iroquois Indian Museum’s historic 1850s log cabin, with Mohawk story teller Amanda Tarbell.

The story sessions start at 1 p.m. and last about an hour. There are scary, funny, serious, and sorts of stories to be heard. Space is somewhat limited and reservations by groups are appreciated.

“It’s a perfect time of year to visit the Museum, enjoy the nature trail and to hear the stories,” said the Museum’s Executive Director Maria Vann.

The cost of Storytelling Sundays is included in Museum Admission. Admission is $8 for adults and $5 for children.

Special events, including Storytelling Sundays, are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and friends and members of the Iroquois Indian Museum.

Iroquois Museum to Host 33rd Indian Festival

Written By Editor on 8/13/14 | 8/13/14

The 33rd Iroquois Indian Festival is a celebration of Iroquois creativity and self expression. Held in conjunction with the Museum’s new 2014 exhibit, Standing in Two Worlds: Iroquois in 2014, the two-day festival has many other features. 

There is an all Iroquois Indian Art Market where visitors may shop for authentic items.  Both traditional and contemporary arts are showcased. The Sky Dancers from Six Nations Reserve in Ontario will perform traditional Iroquois social dances, and may invite the public out onto the dance floor to participate. The Children’s area will feature arts & crafts activities including beadwork and cornhusk doll making.

Local wildlife rehabilitator Kelly Martin will discuss wildlife conservation in the region and present a variety of wild animals including birds of prey. The Museum’s archaeology department will be available to identify archaeological finds and give demonstrations of flintknapping and other early technologies.  Serving as Master of ceremonies for the two-day festival is Perry Ground, a Turtle Clan member of the Onondaga Nation. His life’s work is educating all people on the history, culture and beliefs of the Iroquois. Storytelling by Kay Olan, Mohawk.

The event will take place at the Iroquois Museum on 324 Caverns Road from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday August 30th/31st. Admission is $10 for adults; $5 for children.

Social Dance, Basket Making at Iroquois Museum

Written By Editor on 7/29/14 | 7/29/14

HOWES CAVE, N.Y. -- Social Dance Saturday and Mohawk basket making are on the August calendar at the Iroquois Indian Museum.

On Saturday, Aug. 9, the Niagara River Dancers perform for Social Dance Saturday. The dance troupe from Tuscarora, is from one of the seven Iroquois Indian reservations in New York State. Social dances are group dances that encourage audience participation and are performed to the music created by voice and traditional Iroquois instruments.

On Saturday, Aug. 16, the “Catch the Basket” mentoring program features Mohawk basket makers Carrie Hill and Laura Mitchell. The artists continue a family tradition that extends generations. Hill creates fancy baskets of Sweetgrass and Black Ash. She is dedicated to passing on her knowledge and teaches Mohawk youth at the Akwesasne Cultural Center in Hogansburg.

Special Events are included with museum admission.

About the Museum

The Iroquois Indian Museum is an educational institution dedicated to fostering understanding of Iroquois culture using Iroquois art as a window to that culture.  The Museum is a venue for promoting Iroquois art and artists, and a meeting place for all peoples to celebrate Iroquois culture and diversity.  As an anthropological institution, it is informed by research on archaeology, history, and the common creative spirit of modern artists and craftspeople.

The Museum represents the world’s most comprehensive collection of modern Iroquois art work. This collection celebrates the ancient unity of the Iroquois still expressed in the creative spirit of today’s artists. A special interactive children’s area introduces young visitors to Iroquois traditions through a variety of crafts, games and technologies. A guide posted Nature Park of 45 acres is open year round for walks, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing.

Iroquois Museum to Host Oneida Dancers July 12

Written By Editor on 7/3/14 | 7/3/14

Howes Cave, N.Y. -- The Iroquois Indian Museum will have a Social Dance Saturday on July 12 at the Museum featuring Onota’a:ka (Oneida Nation Dancers), based in the central New York Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) community of Oneida.



Founded by Elder and Wolf Clan Mother Maisie Shenandoah for the purpose of cultural education, the troupe’s original purpose continues to be carried forth by daughter Vicki, granddaughter Tawn:tene (Cindy Schenandoah Stanford) and an extended family with common goals.  For the Schenandoahs, dance is not a separate expression of heritage and thanksgiving, but one that is thoroughly integrated into daily life. Onota’a:ka selects a repertoire that is enjoyable for the crowd and encourages participation. 

Social Dance Saturday and all events at the Museum are free with paid admission. The Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 12 Noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. It is closed Monday. Regular admission is $8 for adults, $6.50 for seniors/students and $5 for children ages 5-12. Children under five are free when accompanied by an adult. Special group rates are available by calling the Museum at 518-296-8949. 

For more information, visit www.iroquoismuseum.org.

Iroquois Museum Holding Tattoo Exhibit

Written By Editor on 9/5/13 | 9/5/13

The Iroquois Indian Museum is holding an exhibit on tribal tattoos known as Indian Ink. The exhibit will take place through November. From their website:
Inspired by Mohawk artist/curator Ryan Rice's Native Love exhibit and a presentation by Carla Hemlock of Kahnawake, IndianInk will showcase contemporary tattoo art, both the work of young Haudenosaunee designers such as Lyle Logan and Ike Hopper and skin art selected and commissioned by others. Once widespread among Indigenous peoples of the northeast, the patterns and practices of this extraordinary tradition of body modification had declined by the mid 1800s as a consequence of Christianity, assimilation, and relocation. Today, this ancient art is undergoing a spectacular resurgence in Native and non-Native communities. IndianInk will include contemporary expressions with political, cultural, philosophical, or personal significance and a look back at historical tattooing.

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